Safiya Sinclair | 'There wasn’t much space for me as a woman to grow and thrive'

Safiya Sinclair | 'There wasn’t much space for me as a woman to grow and thrive'

"Born four days late, a bruised almond/left puckering in the salty yolk,/the soft bone of my skull was concave,/a thumbprint in wax, like the coin/for the ferryman had been pressed there/overnight.”

This arresting description of her own birth is from Safiya Sinclair’s poem “Osteology”, which appears in her astonishing début collection Cannibal, publishing on National Poetry Day 2020 (1st October). Her poems explore themes of race, womanhood, colonial history and exile, but are also intimately rooted in the sights, sounds and rhythms of her Jamaican childhood.

The story of how Sinclair di...

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