Cecilia Ekbäck | “The winters are often lonely, it’s dark when you get up and dark when you come home from work—it’s always dark”

Cecilia Ekbäck | “The winters are often lonely, it’s dark when you get up and dark when you come home from work—it’s always dark”

A “wolf winter”, or Vargavinter in Swedish, is a way of describing an exceptionally long and bitter winter, but it also has a second meaning, as début novelist Cecilia Ekbäck explains: “It’s also what we call the hardest period in a human being’s life. After losing someone or after an illness, that period where you feel confronted by your own mortality and you feel fundamentally alone.”

Wolf Winter (Hodder, February) is set in Sweden in 1717, where a family (Maija, her husband Paavo and their daughters Frederika and young Dorotea) have left their home by the coast in Finland to join a tiny...

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