Dahl, Baddiel and Rowell among World Book Day 2016 titles

Dahl, Baddiel and Rowell among World Book Day 2016 titles

Next year’s World Book Day titles will include stories by Roald Dahl, David Baddiel and Rainbow Rowell.
 
The list, revealed today (11th September), comprises of 11 books in five age categories: two plus, five-seven, seven-9, 9+ and YA. In the youngest age group, the titles are Kipper’s Visitor by Mick Inkpen (Hodder Children’s Books) and Supertato: Hap-pea Ever After by Sue Hendra & Paul Linnet (Simon & Schuster Children’s Books).
 
The Great Mouse Plot by Roald Dahl & Quentin Blake (Puffin), the true story of how Dahl tricked the sweetshop owner as a child, an extract from his autobiography Boy, is a title in the five-seven age category, as is Daisy and the Trouble With Jack by Kes Gray & Nick Sharratt (Red Fox). The seven-9 year olds will be able to choose between Welcome to the World of Norm by Jonathan Meres (Orchard) and Star Wars: Adventures in Wild Space by Cavan Scott (Egmont).
 
The options for the 9+ age group will be The Boy Who Could Do What He Liked by David Baddiel (HarperCollins) and Harper and the Sea of Secrets by Cerrie Burnell and Laura Ellen Anderson (Scholastic), and for YA readers Spot the Difference, a new story by James Dawson (Hot Key), and Kindred Spirits by Rainbow Rowell (Macmillan Children’s Books).
 
Readers in Ireland will also be able to buy One Good Turn by Brian Gallagher (O’Brien Press).
 
World Book Day director Kirsten Grant said the list gives a snapshot of what children will be reading in 2016. “World Book Day continues to engage more young readers and becomes ever more successful year-on-year. I am hugely excited about our plans for 2016.”
 
World Book Day 2015 boosted children’s book sales in the UK by 24%, which Grant attributed to sales of the £1 titles.

“I was so delighted with World Book Day this year, it was so much bigger than in 2014,” she told the Bookseller last month. “I felt we turned the corner not only in book sales and token redemption but also in terms of the huge saturation of media coverage.”