Trainspotting voted 'favourite Scottish novel'

Trainspotting voted 'favourite Scottish novel'

Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh (Vintage) has emerged as the winner of Book Week Scotland’s poll to find the favourite Scottish novel of the last 50 years, beating books by Ian Rankin and Iain Banks.

Nearly 9,000 votes were cast in the search for the nation’s favourite novel, with 10% of the votes going to Welsh’s debut novel about drug addiction in Edinburgh, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this year. Book lovers from around the globe got involved in the poll, with votes coming in from 57 different countries.
 
Commenting on the announcement, Welsh said: "I don't know if Trainspotting is the best Scottish book - I'm far from convinced it's my own best book. But I'm obviously flattered just to be on that list of great novels with those amazing writers, especially when I consider some of the brilliant books and my personal favourites that never made it onto this list."
 
The top 10 favourite Scottish novels of the last 50 years were revealed to be:

1.  Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh (Vintage) - 833 votes
2.  Lanark by Alasdair Gray (Canongate Canons) - 750 votes
3.  Black and Blue by Ian Rankin (Orion) - 591 votes
4.  The Bridge by Iain Banks (Abacus) - 496 votes
5.  One Fine Day in the Middle of the Night by Christopher Brookmyre (Abacus) - 416 votes
6.  Excession by Iain M Banks (Orbit) - 330 votes
7.  Morvern Callar by Alan Warner (Vintage) - 296 votes
8.  44 Scotland Street by Alexander McCall Smith (Abacus) - 282 votes
9.  The Trick is to Keep Breathing by Janice Galloway (Vintage) - 271 votes
10.  Docherty by William McIlvanney (Canongate Books) - 269 votes
 
The poll was launched by Scottish Book Trust as part of Book Week Scotland 2013. Members of the public chose from a shortlist of 50 titles designed to reflect the depth and breadth of Scottish writing, compiled by author and literary critic Stuart Kelly and Scottish Book Trust staff.
 
Commenting on the results of the poll, Kelly said: “Crime, comedy, science fiction, the avant-garde - the public vote has reinforced the diversity of contemporary Scottish writing. My sole regret is that we have only one woman on the list - that said, The Trick is to Keep Breathing is indubitably a contemporary classic.”
 
Marc Lambert, chief executive of Scottish Book Trust, said that Trainspotting was "undoubtedly deserving of the top spot. It remains a brilliant read, and its publication was a key cultural moment in the history of the Scottish novel.”

As a result of the list, Canongate is bringing forward the publication of their reissue of William McIlvanney's Docherty, making it available in shops next week. This comes at the same time as the news that his Laidlaw trilogy is being adapted for television.