Henning Mankell dies after cancer battle

Henning Mankell dies after cancer battle

Swedish crime writer Henning Mankell has died following a battle with neck and lung cancer. 

His UK publishers, Penguin Random House imprints Vintage and Harvill Secker, said it was a "privilege to have worked with a man of such talent and passion" and that the world was "a sadder place for having lost such a charismatic and honourable man."

A leading figure in the 'Nordic noir' genre, Mankell is best known for the Wallander series featuring detective Kurt Wallander.

A spokesperson for Vintage and Harvill Secker said: "Beloved by readers across the world, especially for his Kurt Wallander series, it was a privilege to have worked with a man of such talent and passion, and to have been his UK publisher for so many years.  He was an inspiration not just as a writer, but as someone who always stood up for the rights of others.   He will be so very sorely missed. The world is a sadder place for having lost such a charismatic and honourable man."

Mankell died aged 67 in Gothenburg last night (4th October), after battling lung and neck cancer since diagnosis in January 2014.

He wrote about coping with cancer in his book Quicksand (Harvill Secker), publishing in the UK next year.

Alison Hennessey, senior editor at Harvill Secker, who edited Mankell's last four books, tweeted: "Not only was he an inspiration as a writer, he was an extraordinary human-rights campaigner, & one of the most interesting men I’ve ever met."

He sold more than 1.6m copies (value £10.4m) through Nielsen BookScan since records began.