Palgrave joins OASPA

Palgrave joins OASPA

Palgrave Macmillan has become a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association (OASPA), the trade association which represents the interests of open access publishers in all academic disciplines.
 
OASPA enables exchange of information, setting standards, advancing models, advocacy, education, and the promotion of innovation in open access.
 
Carrie Calder, Palgrave Macmillan director of market development, said: “It’s important that we advance open access in the humanities and social sciences, while ensuring models are sustainable. We know the demand is there, because over two thirds of our academics across all HSS disciplines said that they thought open access would benefit their specific field."
 
She added that "there is still much more experimentation to be done", but described the new membership of OASPA as being at "the forefront of open access publishing".   

Palgrave Macmillan published its first open access monograph, Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850-2000, funded by The Wellcome Trust, under a CC-BY license in November 2013. However, an open access option has been available for journals since 2011, and for Palgrave Pivots and monographs since January 2013.
 
Following research, OASPA developed separate membership criteria for open access books this year. Its president, Paul Peters, praised Palgrave Macmillan's "commitment to a standard licensing approach by offering the CC BY license for their open access books".

He also expressed OASPA's hope that this will "add to the momentum of creative commons licensing uptake for open access books on a broader scale, as is already well established for open access journals, and that Palgrave Macmillan will help to lead the way for more OA book publishers to follow suit".

Other publishers who are already members of the OASPA include Cambridge University Press, EDP Sciences, Oxford University Press and Wiley. Last month, Sage Publications had its OASPA membership placed under review after one of its journals accepted a hoax article during a 'sting'.