Judith Kerr: E-books will not replace print for children

Judith Kerr: E-books will not replace print for children

E-books will not replace printed children’s books, bestselling children’s author Judith Kerr told the BBC.
 
Some books are “alright” as e-books, but only if they’re the type of book that is read once then cast aside, she said. “I don’t think printed books will ever disappear, they’re a totally different thing.”
 
Kerr was speaking to the BBC ahead of the publication of her 31st book, The Crocodile That Lives Under the Bed, which will be released in the autumn by HarperCollins Children’s Books.
 
The story is about a boy who goes to a crocodile with the boy who lives under the bed. When asked if it is now harder to draw than earlier on in her career, Kerr said she gets “more and more pernickety”.
 
Kerr is one of the UK’s best-known picture book authors and has been writing and illustrating books for more than 40 years.
 
The Mog series of books, which started with Mog the Forgetful Cat (HarperCollins) in 1970, was based on her family’s real cat.
 
“I was staggered by what cats are like. They’re so weird, they do such odd things,” she said.
 
Kerr also denied that the tiger in The Tiger That Came to Tea was a symbol for anything in her past, when she fled Nazi Germany with her family as a child.
 
“People always read all sorts of things into it,” she said. “Well, you wouldn’t snuggle the Gestapo, would you?”