'Experts' caution over student and staff visas

'Experts' caution over student and staff visas

The threat of isolation from Europe’s workplace regulations, visa issues among EU-born staffers, and a decrease in the number of European graduate students could affect UK academic publishing in the wake of Brexit, experts warned at Frankfurt Book Fair.

Speaking on a panel yesterday (20th October) about the impact of Brexit on academic publishing, chaired by former Publishers Association c.e.o. Richard Mollet, Andy Robinson, senior vice-president and m.d. for society services at Wiley, said considering that 10% of the UK publishing workforce comes from the EU—almost twice the national average (5.6%)—the industry is “going to have to come to terms with the impact on EU [nationals] employed in the UK”, depending on what legislation the government implements regarding freedom of movement.

He added that 125,000 students from the EU are currently studying in the UK, generating some £2.7bn for the UK economy.

Academic and policy consultant Richard Fisher agreed that decisions over student visas could result in a “challenge”, adding: “When she was home secretary, Theresa May took the most robust view possible around restricting student visas. It’s slightly unfortunate that she’s now prime minister, from that point of view. Universities recognise that this is not a fight they’re going to win.”