Capital Crime to open school students' eyes to publishing careers

Capital Crime to open school students' eyes to publishing careers

London’s newly launched crime and thriller festival Capital Crime is preparing a new social outreach initiative to provide sixth form students with an insight into how they might be able to pursue careers in writing or publishing.

Masterminded by novelist and screenwriter Adam Hamdy with Goldsboro Books m.d David Headley, who together co-founded the 'Comic-Con'-style crime and thriller festival Capital Crime, the initiative is intended to "open young people’s eyes to a wider range of possibilities", recognising that talented young people in schools across London may not realise that a career in publishing or working as a writer is a viable option.

In early 2019 Capital Crime will ask 10 London comprehensive schools to each select two sixth-form students with"some recognised ability in creative writing". In spring 2019, those 20 students will then be invited to attend a seminar evening in central London where they will have the opportunity to hear from authors and publishing professionals and be given an insight into how they might be able to pursue careers in writing or publishing.

The 20 students invited to participate in the initiative will also be given complimentary day passes to attend Capital Crime on Saturday 28th September 2019 with full access to all the panels and the opportunity to meet established authors and publishing professionals.

Author Hamdy, who was raised and educated in comprehensive schools around London, said: "Growing up in London, violent crime was commonplace. It was an easy thing to get drawn into, and it’s sad to see the situation is getting worse. I came from a typical rough and tumble London home and am living proof that there’s more money to be made writing about crime than committing it. We hope the Capital Crime Social Outreach Initiative can open young people’s eyes to a wider range of possibilities."

Headley, whose DHH Literary Agency only recently announced a "pitch an agent day" in York this December, added: "It’s essential that the publishing industry is reflective of society at large. We need to ensure young people from diverse backgrounds are encouraged to explore the possibility of careers as writers or working in publishing and Capital Crime is proud to play its part. We hope the experience and exposure will help broaden young people’s minds and attract new and diverse voices to publishing."

To be considered for the initiative, representatives of schools in the Greater London area are encouraged to email Capital Crime at info@capitalcrime.org, explaining why their school would benefit.