Barrington Stoke book guide for kids with dyslexia

Barrington Stoke book guide for kids with dyslexia

Publisher Barrington Stoke and charity Dyslexia Action will this month release a free guide to books for children with dyslexia or reading difficulties.
 
Dive In: A Guide to Choosing Children’s Books for Reluctant Readers and Readers With Dyslexia, lists 40 different titles and is aimed at encouraging children who struggle with reading to enjoy books. It replaces Dyslexia Action’s previous guide, published in 2008 in association with Waterstones.
 
“The 2008 edition was a bit out of date and we wanted to liven it up a bit,” said Helen Donovan, literacy programme manager at Dyslexia Action, pointing out that a there are now a lot more dyslexia-friendly books on the market. She has also widened out the guide’s remit to include children with different kinds of reading needs.
 
The books were chosen by Dyslexia Action and Barrington Stoke and divided into three categories: 5-8, 9-12 and teen.
 
Donovan said choosing the books was “one of the hardest things I’ve had to do”. She said she looked for books that will interest readers who think words are hard work, so opted for plot-driven fiction titles, such as David Walliams’ Gangsta Granny (HarperCollins Children's Books).
 
“For a dyslexic child it’s all about the plot,” she said. “Descriptive writing isn’t right for this group. Gangsta Granny is funny and lighthearted and won’t be a chore to read, we want it to be fun.”
 
There are some non-fiction titles listed, including Quentin Blake’s Drawing for the Artistically Undiscovered (Klutz), and teen titles such as Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner (Hot Key). Every section has at least one book published by Barrington Stoke.
 
Mairi Kidd, m.d. at Barrington Stoke, which specialises in dyslexia friendly books, said she wanted to get involved with the project because parents often don’t know where to start when they have a child who is a struggling or reluctant reader.
 
“Having the guide available in bookshops and libraries is an important signpost for these parents, making it clear that the shop or library is there to promote reading for all and the bookseller or librarian keen to help,” she said.
 
A PDF of the guide will be free to download from the Dyslexia Action website from the 17th November. The charity will send print copies to bookshops towards the end of the year. Alternatively, organisations can request a copy by emailing hello@dyslexiaaction.org.uk.
 
The guide is supported by KPMG, which donated funds for printing costs.