BA criticises Amazon for 'ill-judged' hardship fund donation

BA criticises Amazon for 'ill-judged' hardship fund donation

The Booksellers Association (BA) has branded Amazon's £250,000 donation to a booksellers hardship fund an “ill-judged attempt to mitigate a decades-long campaign to undermine the bookselling sector”.

Yesterday, it was revealed the retail giant was behind a huge donation to the Book Trade Charity fund for booksellers facing hardship during the pandemic. The pledge was sparked by a trade crowdfunder and brought the total fund up to £380,000.

Meryl Halls, m.d. of the BA, earlier supported the crowdfunding effort and praised the “heartfelt and moving response” from the trade for her struggling members.

However, Halls said she was now shocked by the revelation that Amazon had donated the large sum and said many of her members were angry and had responded by calling for the company to pay its fair share of tax.

She said: “The BA and our independent booksellers are taken aback by the revelation that the recent large donation is from the company held responsible by the majority of booksellers for the long-term demise of high street bookselling, and booksellers’ responses have been first stunned silence as they process the dissonance of the situation, followed quickly by a real sense of anger at the discordance at the heart of the gesture. 

“There is a definite sense that this seems like an ill-judged attempt to mitigate a decades-long campaign to undermine the bookselling sector at the moment when we are facing the biggest existential threat we have ever faced.

“A common reaction amongst booksellers has been – ‘if Amazon really wants to support independent bookshops, then let them join bookshops in paying its fair share of tax’.”

The identity of the donor was originally not revealed by the charity, who said only that it had come from someone "committed to independent bookshops as part of a mixed bookselling economy".

Amazon,  which announced plans for 2,000 more jobs in the UK last year, claims it has invested more than £18bn in UK jobs and infrastructure since 2010. The firm also claims to have contributed £793m in UK tax during 2018, although £573m was through indirect taxation via charges like VAT for customers. In direct taxation, it paid £220m on revenues of £10.89bn.

The firm declined to comment.