Audiences flock to 'books, booze and boogie woogie'

Audiences flock to 'books, booze and boogie woogie'

<p>The UK has become home to a growing number of fringe literary events, arising out of book clubs and &quot;the more general democratisation of cultural criticism&quot;, according to <em>The Guardian. </em></p><p>Attracted by a combination of &quot;books, booze and boogie-woogie&quot;, the paper says there is new breed of events, drawing a large following of literary enthusiasts. </p><p>The article points out that there is &quot;a bustling marketplace&quot; of events, including the Literary Death Match - &quot;adversarial readings with a deliberately chaotic feel&quot; - and the Shoreditch House Literary Salon - which claims that &quot;not since the Marquis de Sade has reading been this sexy&quot; - as well as The Book Club Boutique, Homework, To Hell With the Lighthouse, Bookslam, The Firestation Book Swap and 5x15. </p><p>&quot;Up and down the country, particularly in the previously unfashionable areas of densely populated cities, in the spare spaces of pubs, clubs and restaurants, in arts centres and at micro-festivals, a new breed of literary event is flourishing,&quot; the article said. </p><p>&quot;Often influenced by trends wafting in from the other side of the Atlantic, for example, celebrated New York storytelling event the Moth, and drawing heavily on the relaxed, interactive ethos of comedy nights and bring-your-ukelele music sessions, they are youthful, energetic, imaginative and defiantly lo-fi &ndash; and a world away from their rather more strait-laced cousin, the book reading.&quot; </p><p>And the benefits to the authors are just as important, the article points out. It is &quot;a chance to put their work before the public, to foster word-of-mouth recommendations, to boost, by however small a margin, book sales, and an opportunity to hook up with other writers and take a night off from staring at the computer screen&quot;. </p>