Weekly E-Book Ranking: Morris holds on to the top spot

Weekly E-Book Ranking: Morris holds on to the top spot

Heather Morris’ The Tattooist of Auschwitz tops the Weekly E-Book Ranking for a second week, in the same seven-day period that saw the hardback edition soar into the Original Fiction number one.

What a journey this title has been on. Released in January, it has had among the longest build-ups to the Weekly E-Book Ranking number one from its publication, with the exception of its long-term bugbear Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine (which took nine months to gestate into an 18-week number one) and, obviously, The Handmaid’s Tale, which was published in e-book in 2012—27 years after its print release, although e-books weren’t really a thing in 1985—and only hit the weekly ranking number one in 2017, following the launch of the Channel 4 adaptation.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz, which spent a record 11 weeks in second place, seems to have benefited greatly from a one-day spell at 98p a few weeks ago. Though it returned immediately to £2.99, it has now gained the momentum to leapfrog Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine—which, until this chart, had instantly returned to the top spot after being knocked from it three times in five weeks. However, the Honeyman is never really over—after passing the half-a-million-sold-mark a week ago, the paper- back’s sales are still buoyant: last week it posted a 5% jump in volume week on week, after six months on sale. If the e-book repeats the trick for the same period, you might be reading another laboured variant of the “Oliphant in the Room” headline in next week’s issue.

Suzanne Wright’s Embers was the highest new entry in the top 20, beating Lindsey Kelk’s One in a Million to fourth place. The fourth title (appositely) in Wright’s The Dark in You paranormal romance series, it becomes her third title in a row to shoot straight into the top 20, after 2016’s Blaze and 2017’s Ashes. Kelk, in fifth, charted in her highest position in the e-book ranking yet. While Wright’s title is set in a demon lair, Kelk’s takes place on social media (insert cynical joke about the digital age here).