#WhatsABookWorth — A #FutureChat recap

#WhatsABookWorth — A #FutureChat recap

'I don't remember how much I paid for the books'

That line, in a nutshell, captures the answer we heard when we asked The FutureBook's digital community in #FutureChat "What's a book worth?"

It was the historical novelist Jane Steen—who will journey from Chicago to join us at Author Day, 30th November—who tweeted early in our session:

Those historical people, you know.

The question has been called, as it happens, by another historical type, the author and historian Mathew Lyons (pictured), who has set up a campaign, because—he told our good colleague at The Bookseller Sarah Shaffi—"It would be nice if publishers thought more broadly and imaginatively about marketing the emotional value of books." Well, he got little disagreement from the #FutureChat brigade. 


Join us each Friday live on Twitter at 4:00 p.m. London (BST), 3:00 p.m. GMT, 5:00 p.m. Rome (CEST), 11:00 a.m. New York (ET), 10:00 a.m. Chicago (CT), 9:00 a.m. Denver (MT), 8:00 a.m. Los Angeles (PT), 5:00 a.m. Honolulu (HAST).


This week, the obvious thing to do by way of recap is to get out of the way. The many voices in our chat said it all and got into some interesting digressions triggered by Lyons, who was good enough to join us.

Notice that a great deal of the conversation centered on personal preferences for e-reading vs. reading in print. We never quite got to someone saying that a print book is "worth" more emotionally than an ebook (I would disagree with this, just for the record) but we certainly spent a lot of time cake-walking around the topic.

And as far as I can, the most-tweeted comment came from Suw Charman-Anderson:

Before I had it over to the tweeterie, let me just give you a few ways to get more on the #WhatsABookWorth campaign, in case you're interested.

A selection of tweets from the session follows, with our thanks for everyone's participation. We'll see you in the next #FutureChat.



Join us each Friday live on Twitter at 4:00 p.m. London (BST), 3:00 p.m. GMT, 5:00 p.m. Rome (CEST), 11:00 a.m. New York (ET), 10:00 a.m. Chicago (CT), 9:00 a.m. Denver (MT), 8:00 a.m. Los Angeles (PT), 5:00 a.m. Honolulu (HAST).

Don't miss our series of  Five-Minute Manifestos" for The Future of the Book Business.

We have 12 manifesti (dodici manifesti!) published so far, with more to come. 

In his article Those magnificent manifestos, The Bookseller editor Philip Jones reiterated his call for the FutureBook community to reflect on five years of the digital dynamic, "to challenge the customs we have begun to adopt." The response has been robust, and we offer a big thanks to all our manifesto writers. 

  • Also: Please plan to join us on 4th December at The Mermaid in London for the fifth-anniversary FutureBook Conference
  • And we'd like you to consider participating in our inaugural Author Day (#AuthorDay) in central London, 30th November, the kick-off to a week of #FutureBook15 events.

Main image - iStockphoto: Sun 777