March 2019 New Titles: Non-fiction Previews
Selected by Caroline Sanderson

Last month I mentioned the number of stellar anthologies being published in February; and this month there are three more: The Good Immigrant USA, New Daughters of Africa and Safe. Each is a veritable treasure-trove of BAME writing, and each has a champion of writing and diversity as its editor (step forward Nikesh Shukla, Margaret Busby and Derek Owusu respectively). You wait for years for books like these to take their rightful place on the shelf, and then three come along at once.

For Mother’s Day, I particularly like the look of Elma van Vliet’s Mum, Tell Me: A Give & Get Back Book for all those things you’ve always wanted to know but never got around to asking. If your relationship with your Mommie Dearest is less than harmonious, then you could consider giving her The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read by Philippa Perry instead—or if not, certainly ask your own children to give it to you.

And in a month when sales of Pinch of Nom—a book of slimming recipes, albeit healthy and delicious ones—look likely to take off like a rocket, Bee Wilson’s The Way We Eat Now made me think as never before about why we have such a complex, and ever-shifting relationship with food. I’m old enough to remember when spaghetti bolognese came out of a tin, and Monday supper was always cold cuts. Now I sometimes wonder, First World Problems-style, whether life might be sweeter if I made my own pesto.

Book Of The Month

  • Book of the month
    Health, Diet & Parenting

    Pinch of Nom

    by Kay Featherstone & Kate Allinson

    Remember how Joe Wicks burst on the publishing scene three and a bit years ago, and went on to smash records with non-fiction sales that were anything but "lean"? Prepare for a similar trajectory for this first book from the chef creators of the UK's most frequented food blog, Pinch of Nom, which has an extremely engaged community of 1.5 million users, as well as 1.33 million Likes on Facebook.

    Bluebird, £20.00, 21st March 2019, 9781529014068

Browse March 2019 New Titles: Non-fiction Previews

  • Editors choice
    Popular science/history

    The Creativity Code: How AI is learning to write, paint and think

    by Marcus du Sautoy

    If you've been blithely thinking, as I have, that creativity is beyond the scope of Artificial Intelligence, this compelling book might overturn your vision of the future. Delving into recent developments in AI, as well as how algorithms work and the mathematical rules that underpin them, du Sautoy examines the question of the human creativity code and whether it will be cracked once machines have learned enough about how our brains respond to the art, music and words that move us. It is also a book about what it means to be human.

    Fourth Estate Ltd, £20.00, 18th February 2019, 9780008288150
  • Editors choice
    Food & Drink

    My Bangladesh Kitchen: Recipes and food memories from a family table

    by Saira Hamilton

    My cookery choice of the month is this enticing book on the authentic cuisine of Bangladesh by a private chef and cookery teacher who was a finalist on Masterchef 2013, winning acclaim for her "deft spicing". Accompanied by vibrant and evocative on-location photography and engaging text, her delicious recipes have an abundance of vegetables and fish—and mustard oil as a characteristic and pretty ubiquitous ingredient—and include classics, regional specialities, street snacks and celebration food.

    Lorenz Books, £20.00, 1st November 2018, 9780754834502
  • Editors choice
    Travel & Exploration

    Horizon

    by Barry Lopez

    I can't wait to read this book "of enormous ambition combining memoir, history, travel writing and philosophy" by the revered author of 1986 travel classic Arctic Dreams, often cited as seminal by Robert Macfarlane, Helen Macdonald and many others for its environmental concerns. Horizon contains Lopez's recollections of his travels to six regions of the world: from Oregon to the high Arctic, and from the Galpagos to the Kenyan desert and beyond, and the encounters that have shaped his work as he "searches for meaning and purpose in a broken world".

    The Bodley Head Ltd, £25.00, 28th March 2019, 9781847925770
  • Editors choice
    Health, Diet & Parenting

    The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

    by Philippa Perry

    "This book is for parents who not only love their children, but want to like them too." In her 20 years as a psychotherapist, Perry has learned about how strong, loving bonds can be forged with children. But it's in the voice of a fellow parent that this compelling book is chiefly written, as Perry—who has a daughter with husband Grayson Perry—explains how the way we were brought up impacts on our own parenting. Of maximum help if read while pregnant, but still an essential read if your children are grown-up.

    Penguin Life, £14.99, 7th March 2019, 9780241250990
  • Editors choice
    Biography/memoir

    The World I Fell Out Of

    by Melanie Reid

    I loved this gutsy memoir by the award-winning writer of the long-running Spinal Column in the Times Weekend magazine, who was paralysed from the top of her chest downwards when she fell from her horse in 2010 at the age of 52. In a first book that is shot through with humour as well as pathos, Reid relates the unflinching "back story" of the year she spent in hospital, working with incredible determination to regain as much movement in her limbs as possible, and learning to navigate the frightening new world she had fallen into. Foreword by Andrew Marr.

    Fourth Estate, £16.99, 19th March 2019, 9780008291372
  • Editors choice
    Language & Literature

    The Good Immigrant USA

    by Nikesh Shukla

    The Good Immigrant was a landmark book that feels even more essential now than when it was published. Equally essential is this second Good anthology, which collects essays by first- and second-generation immigrants to the USA, in which they explore what it's like to be an "other" in an increasingly divided nation. Contributors, including Chigozie Obioma, Jenny Zhang, Fatimah Asghar and Teju Cole, share powerful stories of living between cultures and languages as they figure out who they are, and where they belong.

    Dialogue Books, £16.99, 7th March 2019, 9780349700366
  • Editors choice
    Food & Drink

    The Way We Eat Now

    by Bee Wilson

    "It's now becoming clear that the way that most people currently eat is not sustainable-either for the planet or for human health." I devoured this enthralling discourse on what we eat (and why) by the award-winning food writer, which takes in everything from bland bananas and the dangers of the disappearing lunch hour, to the way we routinely favour speed and convenience over quality, taste and the sheer joy of eating.

    Fourth Estate Ltd, £12.99, 21st March 2019, 9780008240769
  • Top sellers

    The Planets

    by Brian Cox & Andrew Cohen

    Accompanies a major new primetime BBC series in which Professor Brian Cox shows us our Solar System "as we've never seen it before". It's a dramatic tale of planetary siblings, born from violence, along with a supporting cast of moons, asteroids and comets, and a mysterious and as yet unseen world beyond the Kuiper Belt.

    William Collins, £25.00, 19th May 2019, 9780007488841
  • Art, Design & Fashion

    Isokon and the Bauhaus in Britain

    by Leyla Daybelge

    Featuring many never-before-seen images, this fascinating-sounding book, published to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Bauhaus, is full of stories about the influential inhabitants of the Isokon building in Hampstead, Britain's first Modernist apartment building.

    Batsford Ltd, £25.00, 18th February 2019, 9781849944915
  • Art, Design & Fashion

    Body: The Photography Book

    by Nathalie Herschdorfer

    Billed as the definitive survey of contemporary human-body photography, for an age when "we are obsessed with photography of the human form as never before". Featuring over 350 photographs by more than 100 image makers, this is an "intelligently provocative" blend of art, fashion and advertising.

    Thames & Hudson Ltd, £48.00, 21st March 2019, 9780500021583
  • Editors choice
    Popular science/history

    The Creativity Code: How AI is learning to write, paint and think

    by Marcus du Sautoy

    If you've been blithely thinking, as I have, that creativity is beyond the scope of Artificial Intelligence, this compelling book might overturn your vision of the future. Delving into recent developments in AI, as well as how algorithms work and the mathematical rules that underpin them, du Sautoy examines the question of the human creativity code and whether it will be cracked once machines have learned enough about how our brains respond to the art, music and words that move us. It is also a book about what it means to be human.

    Fourth Estate Ltd, £20.00, 18th February 2019, 9780008288150
  • Editors choice
    Food & Drink

    My Bangladesh Kitchen: Recipes and food memories from a family table

    by Saira Hamilton

    My cookery choice of the month is this enticing book on the authentic cuisine of Bangladesh by a private chef and cookery teacher who was a finalist on Masterchef 2013, winning acclaim for her "deft spicing". Accompanied by vibrant and evocative on-location photography and engaging text, her delicious recipes have an abundance of vegetables and fish—and mustard oil as a characteristic and pretty ubiquitous ingredient—and include classics, regional specialities, street snacks and celebration food.

    Lorenz Books, £20.00, 1st November 2018, 9780754834502
  • Editors choice
    Travel & Exploration

    Horizon

    by Barry Lopez

    I can't wait to read this book "of enormous ambition combining memoir, history, travel writing and philosophy" by the revered author of 1986 travel classic Arctic Dreams, often cited as seminal by Robert Macfarlane, Helen Macdonald and many others for its environmental concerns. Horizon contains Lopez's recollections of his travels to six regions of the world: from Oregon to the high Arctic, and from the Galpagos to the Kenyan desert and beyond, and the encounters that have shaped his work as he "searches for meaning and purpose in a broken world".

    The Bodley Head Ltd, £25.00, 28th March 2019, 9781847925770
  • Editors choice
    Health, Diet & Parenting

    The Book You Wish Your Parents Had Read

    by Philippa Perry

    "This book is for parents who not only love their children, but want to like them too." In her 20 years as a psychotherapist, Perry has learned about how strong, loving bonds can be forged with children. But it's in the voice of a fellow parent that this compelling book is chiefly written, as Perry—who has a daughter with husband Grayson Perry—explains how the way we were brought up impacts on our own parenting. Of maximum help if read while pregnant, but still an essential read if your children are grown-up.

    Penguin Life, £14.99, 7th March 2019, 9780241250990
  • Editors choice
    Biography/memoir

    The World I Fell Out Of

    by Melanie Reid

    I loved this gutsy memoir by the award-winning writer of the long-running Spinal Column in the Times Weekend magazine, who was paralysed from the top of her chest downwards when she fell from her horse in 2010 at the age of 52. In a first book that is shot through with humour as well as pathos, Reid relates the unflinching "back story" of the year she spent in hospital, working with incredible determination to regain as much movement in her limbs as possible, and learning to navigate the frightening new world she had fallen into. Foreword by Andrew Marr.

    Fourth Estate, £16.99, 19th March 2019, 9780008291372
  • Editors choice
    Language & Literature

    The Good Immigrant USA

    by Nikesh Shukla

    The Good Immigrant was a landmark book that feels even more essential now than when it was published. Equally essential is this second Good anthology, which collects essays by first- and second-generation immigrants to the USA, in which they explore what it's like to be an "other" in an increasingly divided nation. Contributors, including Chigozie Obioma, Jenny Zhang, Fatimah Asghar and Teju Cole, share powerful stories of living between cultures and languages as they figure out who they are, and where they belong.

    Dialogue Books, £16.99, 7th March 2019, 9780349700366
  • Editors choice
    Food & Drink

    The Way We Eat Now

    by Bee Wilson

    "It's now becoming clear that the way that most people currently eat is not sustainable-either for the planet or for human health." I devoured this enthralling discourse on what we eat (and why) by the award-winning food writer, which takes in everything from bland bananas and the dangers of the disappearing lunch hour, to the way we routinely favour speed and convenience over quality, taste and the sheer joy of eating.

    Fourth Estate Ltd, £12.99, 21st March 2019, 9780008240769
  • Editors choice
    History

    Arabs: A 3,000-Year History of Peoples, Tribes and Empires

    by Mackintosh-Smith, Tim

    Arabist, translator and travel writer Mackintosh-Smith's Travels With a Tangerine, in which he journeys in the footsteps of medieval Muslim traveller Ibn Battutah, is a favourite travel book of mine. Now, drawing on intimate knowledge of the Arab world (he has been based in Yemen for more than 30 years, and is currently unable to leave due to the violent political situation there), he has written this extraordinarily comprehensive history of the Arabs and their culture, which covers 3,000 years and explains why unity in the Arab world "remains a mirage".

    Yale University Press, £25.00, 1st March 2019, 9780300180282
  • Editors choice
    Language & Literature

    New Daughters of Africa: AN INTERNATIONAL ANTHOLOGY OF WRITING BY WOMEN OF AFRICAN DESCENT

    by Margaret Busby

    Twenty-five years ago, writer and Allison & Busby co-founder Margaret Busby's landmark anthology Daughters of Africa was published to international acclaim. Now this essential companion brings together the work of a new generation of female writers of African descent including memoir, short stories, drama, humour, journalism and speeches.

    Myriad Editions, £30.00, 8th March 2019, 9781912408016
  • Editors choice
    History

    1776: A London Chronicle: or How to Divert Oneself while Losing an Empire

    by

    What was it like living in London and going about one's business as the American War of Independence raged across the Atlantic? This diverting and exquisitely produced chronicle shows us exactly how it was, capturing daily life through diaries, letters, newspaper reports and 370 contemporary illustrations. Among the events it describes are riots at Drury Lane Theatre, the fashion for elaborate head-dresses as it reaches new heights, and cricket played on skates on the frozen Thames.

    The Bunbury Press, £25.00, 1st March 2019, 9780956204615
  • Ones to watch
    Personal development

    The Sisterhood: A Love Letter to the Women Who Have Shaped Me

    by Daisy Buchanan

    Sassy and inspiring guide to female friendship by the prolific journalist, who also has a loyal and devoted Twitter following. She draws lessons from her experience growing up with five adored and infuriating sisters (a household of what she wants you to imagine are the Bennett girls of the 21st century, "looking like the Kardashians but behaving like the Simpsons"), and celebrates the ways in which women connect with one another, all sisters under the skin.

    Headline Book Publishing, £14.99, 7th March 2019, 9781472238856
  • Ones to watch
    Biography/memoir

    Till the Cows Come Home

    by Sara Cox

    Reminiscent of books like The Tent, the Bucket and Me and Where Did it All Go Right?, this sparky and cockle-warming coming-of-age memoir is the first book by the TV and BBC Radio 2 presenter (and now "Book Club" host). She looks back on her happy childhood on a Lancashire farm as the youngest of five siblings, conjuring up a world of dogs, cows, horses, fields and lots of "cack", and declaring her abiding love for the glorious north and for Bolton-"the place whose name runs through my very centre as if I were a stick of seaside rock".

    Coronet , £18.99, 7th March 2019, 9781473672734
  • Ones to watch
    Current affairs

    Invisible Women

    by Caroline Criado Perez

    The writer, broadcaster and feminist activist with a blisteringly good book about systemic discrimination against women. From the gender pay gap and unpaid work imbalance between men and women, and the myth of meritocracy; to the fact that offices are, on average five degrees too cold for the female metabolic rate, or that standard piano keyboards make it much more difficult for female pianists to attain the virtuosity of their male counterparts, it is never less than eye-opening, and frequently staggering.

    Chatto & Windus, £16.99, 7th March 2019, 9781784741723
  • Ones to watch
    Biography/memoir

    Everybody Died, So I Got a Dog: The funny, heartbreaking memoir of losing a family and gaining a dog

    by Emily Dean

    The radio presenter, podcaster and journalist—who co-presents with Frank Skinner on his Absolute Radio Show, which has more than a million listeners a week—looks back, tragicomically, on her mad bohemian childhood, and how her life changed forever when she lost her sister and both her parents within three years. Emerging from profound grief, Dean finally granted herself her lifelong wish to own a puppy—a Shih Tzu named Ray.

    Hodder & Stoughton Ltd, £16.99, 7th March 2019, 9781473671362
  • Ones to watch
    Natural history & Pets

    Still Water: The Deep Life of the Pond

    by John Lewis-Stempel

    Lewis-Stempel's glorious quartet of books about the English countryside, including, most recently, the Wainwright Prize-winning Meadowland, concludes with this look at a year in the life of the farm pond. More then a hundred rare and threatened flora and fauna depend on such ponds, including mayfly larvae and the bats which patrol the night sky above it.

    Doubleday, £14.99, 14th March 2019, 9780857524577
  • Ones to watch
    Current affairs

    Safe: On Black British Men Reclaiming Space

    by Derek Owusu

    Where do black men belong in school, in the media, in their own families, in the LGBTQ+ community, in grime music? Billed as The Good Immigrant meets Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race, this powerful, conversation-sparking anthology, edited by the host of the acclaimed "Mostly Lit" podcast, is the first to examine the experience of being black and male in Britain, asking trenchant questions about what it really means to reclaim and hold space in the landscape of our society.

    Trapeze, £16.99, 7th March 2019, 9781409182634
  • Ones to watch
    Popular science/history

    Humble Pi

    by Matt Parker

    "All humans are stupid when it comes to mathematics." From what makes a wobbly bridge wobble, and a building that shakes to the resonant frequency of a gym class leaping to "I've Got the Power", and the faulty football geometry on UK street signs, the stand-up mathematician and author of Things to Make and Do in the Fourth Dimension demonstrates what happens when maths goes wrong in the real world. It's one of the most entertaining maths books you're ever likely to read. Published ahead of Pi Day on 14th March, and accompanied by a big online campaign.

    Allen Lane, £20.00, 19th March 2019, 9780241360231
  • Ones to watch
    Biography/memoir

    I Talk Too Much

    by Francis Rossi

    If you're going to write an autobiography, make it eventful. While the Quo was selling 100 million records worldwide and notching up 65 hit singles and 32 hit albums, Rossi was also having a hectic time fathering eight children with three mothers, drinking ("I would drink 12 double-tequilas before I could relax and have a drink"), snorting ("I had to have coke just to get out of bed. Until the day my septum dropped out of my nose") and spending untold millions.

    Constable, £20.00, 14th March 2019, 9781472130204
  • Ones to watch
    Current affairs

    The Secret Civil Servant: The Inside Story of Brexit, Government F**k-Ups, and How we Try to Fix Things

    by The Secret Civil Servant

    In the wake of the success of The Secret Barrister, there is sure to be an appetite for this "explosive insider account from behind the scenes of government amid the chaos of Brexit". It's a story that "makes political satires look tame, highlighting the incompetence of the people we elect to serve us, as well as the frightening scale of the political challenges we face today". The author is a civil servant writing anonymously, "because Theresa May probably won't find any of this funny".

    Headline Book Publishing, £14.99, 7th March 2019, 9781472261144
  • Ones to watch
    Humour, Gift & Colouring Books

    Mum, Tell Me

    by Elma van Vliet

    Just as Keri Smith pioneered "wrecking", so Elma van Vliet is at the forefront of the "give and get back" journal. This interactive journal-meets-scrapbook-the author was inspired to create this when her own mother fell ill-is beautifully designed to prompt your mother to share her memories, dreams and wishes. It asks her to record everything from her favourite band as a teenager and her preferred childhood games, to her proudest accomplishment and her first memory of you.

    Particular , £16.99, 7th March 2019, 9780241367223