Is the recommendation dead?

<p>Is the recommendation dead?</p>
<p>The reason I ask this is because of <a href="http://www.thebookseller.com/news/58325-ba-price-trumps-bookseller-picks... latest data from Book Marketing Limited, which was presented at the Booksellers Association conference</a>. It asked people whether they agree or disagree with a number of statements. Unsurprisingly shoppers were most likely to buy a book if it was on offer. But bottom of the pile was &quot;often buy recommended by a bookseller&quot;.</p>
<p>Comments following the story suggested that there was not much&nbsp;surprise&nbsp;at the news.</p>
<p>But it seems baffling to me. Surely the whole fun of going into a bookshop is asking whoever is behind the counter 'I like Jacqueline Wilson and Samuel Beckett; can you recommend me a book that is the best mix of the two?'.<br />
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When I used to work at Waterstone's years ago, the best customers were always the ones who you could spend 10 minutes walking through the shop recommending the books that you absolutely love.<br />
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The statement makes sense if you are mainly shopping online or from a supermarket; their offer is considerably different from your friendly neighbourhood bookshop. But if you are a bookseller in a chain or independent, have you found you are recommending less titles to customers?</p>
<p>I wouldn't have thought so but it would be interesting to hear your thoughts.</p>