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Women's Prize for Fiction to be 'privately funded' for 2013

Individual donors including Christopher Foyle, Joanna Trollope, e-book site Bilbary, Cherie Blair (pictured) and Martha Lane Fox will contribute to private funding for The Women's Prize for Fiction in 2013 "while headline sponsorship negotiations for 2014 and beyond are concluded".

Other supporters include Bob & Co, Richard & Elena Bridges, Jill Green, Lansons Communications, Sue Woodford-Hollick and others who wish to remain anonymous, the prize organisers said.

Kate Mosse, chair of the Women¹s Prize for Fiction board, said, "We were overwhelmed with interest from potential headline sponsors. However, it became clear sponsorship budgets for next year were already committed, so we took the decision to privately fund the Prize for 2013 while we finalised our arrangements for 2014 and beyond. We are delighted that such a wide range of people are supporting this exceptional year and thank them for their support."

The Women¹s Prize for Fiction 2013 has also announced a partnership with Google which will be working with the organisers on a number of new initiatives "which will support the prize's ambition of reaching a wider, international audience."  Google's platforms such as Google+ and YouTube will help to connect authors and judges with a large online audience from around the world, prize organisers said.

Actor Miranda Richardson will be chair of the judges for the 2013 prize, with broadcaster Razi Iqbal, authors Rachel Johnson and JoJo Moyes and writer and activist Natasha Walter making up the panel.

WPF 2013 will also be continuing its partnerships with Southbank Centre, Grazia magazine, The Reading Agency and Book Trust, who have administered the Prize since 1996.

Penguin's Joanna Prior is also one of four new members to the Women's Prize for Fiction board, alongside Felicity Blunt, Karen Jones and Nicola Mendelsohn.

The Women's Prize for Fiction 2013 will be awarded on 5th June, with the winner  receiving a cheque for £30,000 and a limited edition bronze figurine known as a "Bessie", both anonymously endowed.
 

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In these day of equality one wonders whether the title 'Women's Prize for Fiction' is strictly ethical, unless of course the title describes the sponsors or the audience rather than those eligible to compete. The question is therefore, could a male win the Women's Prize for Fiction?

Spinning off a well-known publishing quote, a more politically correct tile could be 'The Men Don't Read Prize for Fiction', which would probably amount to the same thing but be less risky from PC point of view.

With publishers and bookshops having to pull out all the stops to survive, we can expect many more of these competitions, designed to fish the waters and promote hits as cheaply as possible. For example: 'The Last Bookshop Standing' award or the 'Dead as a Peguin' award, dodo never being a publishing imprint choice.

Despite publishing being an almost exclusive female venture, clearly Amazon is still holding on to its male hierarchy because in this day and age it is inconceivable that a Kindle is not produced in pink. Mattel would never have let that one pass and thinking about it I'm surprised they haven't produced a Barbie tablet to entice half the population that does not spend every evening playing Halo online.

If however, some wag is brave or stupid enough to come up with the 'Men's Prize for Fiction', I'm sure we will be in for some fun and games sisters but why would they? Men don’t read.

http://www.darcyblaze.com/

As an interesting aside, there is actually a publishing imprint called Dodo Publishing. They take out-of-print books and make them available as e-books. Never say never.

In these day of equality one wonders whether the title 'Women's Prize for Fiction' is strictly ethical, unless of course the title describes the sponsors or the audience rather than those eligible to compete. The question is therefore, could a male win the Women's Prize for Fiction?

Spinning off a well-known publishing quote, a more politically correct tile could be 'The Men Don't Read Prize for Fiction', which would probably amount to the same thing but be less risky from PC point of view.

With publishers and bookshops having to pull out all the stops to survive, we can expect many more of these competitions, designed to fish the waters and promote hits as cheaply as possible. For example: 'The Last Bookshop Standing' award or the 'Dead as a Peguin' award, dodo never being a publishing imprint choice.

Despite publishing being an almost exclusive female venture, clearly Amazon is still holding on to its male hierarchy because in this day and age it is inconceivable that a Kindle is not produced in pink. Mattel would never have let that one pass and thinking about it I'm surprised they haven't produced a Barbie tablet to entice half the population that does not spend every evening playing Halo online.

If however, some wag is brave or stupid enough to come up with the 'Men's Prize for Fiction', I'm sure we will be in for some fun and games sisters but why would they? Men don’t read.

http://www.darcyblaze.com/

As an interesting aside, there is actually a publishing imprint called Dodo Publishing. They take out-of-print books and make them available as e-books. Never say never.