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Shukla, Connolly, Kelman on Desmond Elliott longlist

Nikesh Shukla's Costa-nominated Coconut Unlimited has been longlisted for the £10,000 Desmond Elliott Prize 2011, the award for a first novel published in the UK.

The Quartet title joins The Spider Truces by Tom Connolly, completing a prize-winning week for Brighton-based indie Myriad Editions, which has already seen titles win the Authors Club Best First Novel prize and the first Amazon Rising Stars gong for 2011.

Other titles on the 10-strong list include Stephen Kelman's Bloomsbury title Pigeon English and The Afterparty by journalist Leo Benedictus (Jonathan Cape).

The prize is intended to support new writers and to celebrate their fiction; it was inaugurated in honour of publisher and literary agent Desmond Elliott who stipulated that his estate should be invested in a charitable trust that would fund a literary award “to enrich the careers of new writers”.

A shortlist of three books will be announced on 25th May. The winner will be revealed on 23rd June.

The longlist in full:

The Afterparty by Leo Benidictus (Jonathan Cape)
Boxer Beetle by Ned Beauman (Sceptre)
Coconut Unlimited by Nikesh Shukla (Quartet)
The Collaborator by Mirza Waheed (Viking)
Pigeon English by Stephen Kelman (Bloomsbury)
Pub Walks in Underhill Country  by Nat Segnit (Fig Tree)
Saraswati Park by Anjali Joseph (Fourth Estate)
The Spider Truces by Tom Connolly (Myriad Editions)
A Vision of Loveliness by Louise Levene (Bloomsbury)
Who is Mr Satoshi? by Jonathan Lee (William Heinemann)

 

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'Nikesh Shukla's Costa-nominated Coconut Unlimited has been longlisted...'
This book was so, so bad. I don't mean to discourage the writer but I'd be prejudiced against any awards list this was on and avoid the rest of the books on it as well. It feels like there is just no new writing to look forward to anymore.

@eclipse
-- 'Tis all Publicity, Promotion, Hype and a merry go-round style love in.

Eclipse, I completely agree with you. I read this and thought it was dull and derivative. I did appreciate that was an insight into a British - Asian boy's teenage life but the insight didn't inspire me at all.

I feel mean for saying this, but I truly cannot understand why this has been longlisted. From what I can gather, it hasn't sold well at all, but clearly the judging panels have a different taste to me!

I suspect this is another press release that's been printed verbatim, too. It's stunning how many of these new articles lack any kind of editorial perspective or added value. Keep up the good work Bookseller!

Thanks, all. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks so. I haven't read the others on the list except Saraswati Park and that was utterly unremarkable as well. Any suggestions for what one could actually read in new British fiction?

Totally agree with everyone about Coconyt Unlimited. Harmless, but not prize-worthy, and (one assumes) so autobiographical that it would seem an odd choice for a fiction prize.

As to what fiction to look for - try Myriad Editions (I'm biased: they will publish my wife's novel later this year). Everything they put out is very interesting.

'Nikesh Shukla's Costa-nominated Coconut Unlimited has been longlisted...'
This book was so, so bad. I don't mean to discourage the writer but I'd be prejudiced against any awards list this was on and avoid the rest of the books on it as well. It feels like there is just no new writing to look forward to anymore.

@eclipse
-- 'Tis all Publicity, Promotion, Hype and a merry go-round style love in.

Eclipse, I completely agree with you. I read this and thought it was dull and derivative. I did appreciate that was an insight into a British - Asian boy's teenage life but the insight didn't inspire me at all.

I feel mean for saying this, but I truly cannot understand why this has been longlisted. From what I can gather, it hasn't sold well at all, but clearly the judging panels have a different taste to me!

I suspect this is another press release that's been printed verbatim, too. It's stunning how many of these new articles lack any kind of editorial perspective or added value. Keep up the good work Bookseller!

Thanks, all. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks so. I haven't read the others on the list except Saraswati Park and that was utterly unremarkable as well. Any suggestions for what one could actually read in new British fiction?

Totally agree with everyone about Coconyt Unlimited. Harmless, but not prize-worthy, and (one assumes) so autobiographical that it would seem an odd choice for a fiction prize.

As to what fiction to look for - try Myriad Editions (I'm biased: they will publish my wife's novel later this year). Everything they put out is very interesting.