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Sebba succeeds Davis as SoA chair

Biographer Anne Sebba is to take over as chair of the Society of Authors, succeeding Lindsey Davis who is stepping down after one year in the role.

Davis said: “It has been a pleasure to have been chair for the last year but I am now looking forward to spending more time with my writing. I wish my successor the very best in these challenging times.”

She has also resigned from the SoA management committee. 

The committee described Davis as "a fantastic and energetic chair, working way beyond the call of duty promoting the interests of authors, visiting our subgroups around the country and winning friends throughout the industry".

 

Sebba, who has been an SoA member for 30 years, said she felt “deeply honoured to succeed Lindsey Davis and follow a strong line of other authors before her". She continued: "I have served both on the Broadcast Committee and the Management Committee and am endlessly impressed by the valuable work the Society does in making the solitary life of an author feel just a little less lonely by helping to create a sense of belonging to a community.

"When I have needed advice on copyright, the SOA has been there to inform and reassure, just as they are for hundreds of authors who need advice with contracts, tax, difficulties with publishers or finding an agent. 

"The rest of the time the Society is fighting for authors’ rights. In these challenging, digital transitional times, helping authors come to terms with and benefit from the new opportunities, a strong Society of Authors is more necessary than ever.”

Society of Authors chairs are elected for one year, although some—including Davis' predecessor Tom Holland—choose to serve for a further year.

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I would have thought the last people to need a society were authors. What on Earth is the point? You write, what you write, it's a lonely profession by definition. Why do author's need a society just to chat with others? What's there to discuss or fight for? If it's about author's share of royalties, which seems to me the only topic that could be of interest, soon the only organisation to have that conversation with will be Amazon. I note Waterstones are doing as I predicted, mark my words the two London stores won't be the only ones to close. 2013 will see lots more blood on the carpet and we know whodunnit - Kindle.

http://www.darcyblaze.com/

Darcy, Watrstones has been shrinking for years. In fact, the majority of High St retailers are making their estates more manageable as our High Streets get less and less busy, due to both the economic climate and the growth in online shopping. The old model of a-branch-in-every-town is no longer sustainable for most retailers, budget retailers and a few big names aside.

Let's reserve judgement and wait to see how Waterstones do with their Kindle sales this Christmas...ironically, Kindle could turn out to be the saviour of Waterstones in the long term.

I would have thought the last people to need a society were authors. What on Earth is the point? You write, what you write, it's a lonely profession by definition. Why do author's need a society just to chat with others? What's there to discuss or fight for? If it's about author's share of royalties, which seems to me the only topic that could be of interest, soon the only organisation to have that conversation with will be Amazon. I note Waterstones are doing as I predicted, mark my words the two London stores won't be the only ones to close. 2013 will see lots more blood on the carpet and we know whodunnit - Kindle.

http://www.darcyblaze.com/

Darcy, Watrstones has been shrinking for years. In fact, the majority of High St retailers are making their estates more manageable as our High Streets get less and less busy, due to both the economic climate and the growth in online shopping. The old model of a-branch-in-every-town is no longer sustainable for most retailers, budget retailers and a few big names aside.

Let's reserve judgement and wait to see how Waterstones do with their Kindle sales this Christmas...ironically, Kindle could turn out to be the saviour of Waterstones in the long term.