News

National body for libraries needed, says Labour

A Labour party policy report on the public library service has recommended the setting up of a new national body to help the government and local authorities to better safeguard its future.

Dan Jarvis MP, the shadow minister for libraries, told The Bookseller that the body would be able to share ideas and spread better practice. He said: “There aren’t enough people in national government who wake up and worry about what to do with library services. Having a cadre of experienced people working across local authorities and with ministers would provide more coherence.”

Jarvis added: “We can’t pretend all is rosy in the garden, and in the current climate local authorities are having to make difficult decisions. Some are doing it better than others. “There is a role for national government to provide leadership, and spread best practice.”

The report, which Jarvis said is designed as a “talking point” that could go on to inform a future Labour manifesto, is supportive of the idea of co-location of library services.

Jarvis said: “There are a lot of opportunities to form community partnerships would could see libraries protected and kept open.” He also added that volunteers were important for the service, but not at the expense of professional jobs.

The shadow libraries minister said: “The report talks about the importance of volunteers, but makes the point that they should not be a substitution for an adequately funded public library service.”

Jarvis praised the work of professional librarians, saying: “I think librarians are under-valued, but they play an absolutely vital role. The way people will access information in libraries will change in the future, but there will always be a need for them.”

And in the week in which communities secretary Eric Pickles dismissed library campaigners as “a bunch of luvvies” in an exchange in parliament, Jarvis said he hoped the report, “articulates the importance of libraries and what they offer to their communities. The report should be a thoughtful, sensible contribution to a very important debate.”

He added: “Hopefully people will read it, think about it, and come back to us to tell us what they think about it.”

The full report, titled Libraries: Innovation, Co-location and Partnership, is published today (20th December) and can be read here.

Comments: Scroll down for the latest comments and to have your say

By posting on this website you agree to the Bookseller comments policy. Comments go direct to live please be relevant, brief and definitely not abusive. Report any "unsuitable comments by clicking the links"

The MLA is gone, the Advisory Council on Libraries is gone, the libraries bit of the arts council is slashed to almost nothing and there are four and a half people in the DCMS. Although I agree a national body is needed, my concern would be it would just follow the path of the MLA and arts councils and produce reports that the ministers ignore and be ultimately powerless. What is needed is a independent (of government, political parties and senior librarians), strong body that scrutinizes library authorities and if it finds their provision wanting recommends that the minister has to intervene. It has to be completely open in its dealings and make all of its findings and recommendations available online. I re-read the fantastic book decline and fall by my former MP Chris Mullin, the thing that stuck with me about his view of government is there is always a constant stream of money for capital projects and ill thought out "initiatives" but core funding for services always seems to be the last of the list of priorities.

There are few surprises in Labour's new policy review on libraries. That's OK. It is already very widely known what a low-cost, flexible, deeply valued resource they are – except, often, by those who make decisions about them. It does no harm to repeat the message.
Above all, Dan Jarvis stresses the huge potential that remains undeveloped. That is The Library Campaign's concern too.
Public libraries are in big trouble now, whatever the government pretends. But the most frustrating thing is to see the multiplicity of bodies that are supposed to serve public libraries but are paralysed by politeness, or financially cut to the bone. Loads of excellent, innovative work is done by librarians nationwide, but is forgotten and wasted.
We endorse the review's call for proper 'oversight', and work to co-ordinate what's already there. That's what government should be doing, just for starters.

There are few surprises in Labour's new policy review on libraries. That's OK. It is already very widely known what a low-cost, flexible, deeply valued resource they are – except, often, by those who make decisions about them. It does no harm to repeat the message.
Above all, Dan Jarvis stresses the huge potential that remains undeveloped. That is The Library Campaign's concern too.
Public libraries are in big trouble now, whatever the government pretends. But the most frustrating thing is to see the multiplicity of bodies that are supposed to serve public libraries but are paralysed by politeness, or financially cut to the bone. Loads of excellent, innovative work is done by librarians nationwide, but is forgotten and wasted.
We endorse the review's call for proper 'oversight', and work to co-ordinate what's already there. That's what government should be doing, just for starters.

The MLA is gone, the Advisory Council on Libraries is gone, the libraries bit of the arts council is slashed to almost nothing and there are four and a half people in the DCMS. Although I agree a national body is needed, my concern would be it would just follow the path of the MLA and arts councils and produce reports that the ministers ignore and be ultimately powerless. What is needed is a independent (of government, political parties and senior librarians), strong body that scrutinizes library authorities and if it finds their provision wanting recommends that the minister has to intervene. It has to be completely open in its dealings and make all of its findings and recommendations available online. I re-read the fantastic book decline and fall by my former MP Chris Mullin, the thing that stuck with me about his view of government is there is always a constant stream of money for capital projects and ill thought out "initiatives" but core funding for services always seems to be the last of the list of priorities.

There are few surprises in Labour's new policy review on libraries. That's OK. It is already very widely known what a low-cost, flexible, deeply valued resource they are – except, often, by those who make decisions about them. It does no harm to repeat the message.
Above all, Dan Jarvis stresses the huge potential that remains undeveloped. That is The Library Campaign's concern too.
Public libraries are in big trouble now, whatever the government pretends. But the most frustrating thing is to see the multiplicity of bodies that are supposed to serve public libraries but are paralysed by politeness, or financially cut to the bone. Loads of excellent, innovative work is done by librarians nationwide, but is forgotten and wasted.
We endorse the review's call for proper 'oversight', and work to co-ordinate what's already there. That's what government should be doing, just for starters.

There are few surprises in Labour's new policy review on libraries. That's OK. It is already very widely known what a low-cost, flexible, deeply valued resource they are – except, often, by those who make decisions about them. It does no harm to repeat the message.
Above all, Dan Jarvis stresses the huge potential that remains undeveloped. That is The Library Campaign's concern too.
Public libraries are in big trouble now, whatever the government pretends. But the most frustrating thing is to see the multiplicity of bodies that are supposed to serve public libraries but are paralysed by politeness, or financially cut to the bone. Loads of excellent, innovative work is done by librarians nationwide, but is forgotten and wasted.
We endorse the review's call for proper 'oversight', and work to co-ordinate what's already there. That's what government should be doing, just for starters.