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Kindle books 'outselling print' on Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.co.uk customers are buying more Kindle books than print books, both hardback and paperbacks, according to the company.

The retail giant released the statistic to mark the second anniversary of its e-reader, the Kindle, in the UK, securing widespread national media coverage with the announcement.

Amazon.co.uk said that so far in 2012, for every 100 print books sold on the site, it has sold 114 Kindle books, excluding free Kindle books. In the UK, Kindle readers buy four times the number of books they did before owning a Kindle.

Meanwhile, over the past year, the site has seen a more than 400% increase in UK authors and publishers using the self-publishing tool Kindle Direct Publishing.

Kindle EU vice-president Jorrit Van der Meulen said: "Customers in the UK are now choosing Kindle books more often than print books, even as our print business continues to grow. We hit this milestone in the US less than four years after introducing Kindle, so to reach this landmark after just two years in the UK is remarkable and shows how quickly UK readers are embracing Kindle."

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And so it will continue.....

This would be more meaningful if the respective revenue shares were compared, rather than unit sales. Average selling price on both would add a lot more insight also. Many ebooks sell for 99p.

Hi Corey T. We've provided more analysis here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/news-analysis-what-amazon-numbers-real...

Shame it's behind a paywall Katie...

The results are impressive and reaffirm once again Amazon's leadership as ebook seller in UK.

The numbers however need to be taken with a grain of salt:
-114 Unit Sales (ebook) vs 100 Unit Sales (book) refers to sold copies  and not to revenue. There are half million ebooks on sale on Amazon.co.uk priced below or at 3.99 GBP, and many are below 1.00 GBP.
-half year results are generelly more biased in favor of eBooks, because in Jan and Feb many new Kindle Owners (who got their Kindle for Xmas) tend to buy a lot of titles to fill their devices.. After the first phase of over enthusiasm they tend to buy a more regular number of ebooks.
- sold eBooks don't necessarely mean read eBooks. It's something that happens also for pbook, but the ratios are even more evident in the case of eBooks. There is much more impulse buy (due for example to a Kindle deal or a special promotion) than there is on pbook Sales. In the long run it still to be proved if Kindle readers will keep buying so many ebooks just for the sake of buying and not reading them. We are still in a very young market stage.

-Amazon's apparent quicker growth in UK than in US is a comparison that is very arguable and can't be used as ultimate necessary consequence that UK readers appreciate Kindle more than US readers. 
-Amazon's pbook market share is not the same in the two countries.
-in UK ebook market lacks of successful alternative to Kindle, as there might be in US. (BKS missing in UK is an example thereof). Therefore Amazon's market share of eBooks is to be assumned way stronger in UK that it is in US.

Now It should be clear that a comparison, between US and UK based on the time ebook sales match pbook sales for one sole retailer (Amazon) and not for the market overall, is bound to need some more evidence in the best case.
And we are not considering the fact that Kindle in 2007, when Amazon launched it in US, was less sophisticaed and rich than the versions it launched in UK in 2010... And not to mention Kindle Apps for iPad, Android, and so on... Which were added only in the recent years.

Said that congrats to Amazon for delivering such impressive results.

Marcello Vena
@marcellovena

And so it will continue.....

This would be more meaningful if the respective revenue shares were compared, rather than unit sales. Average selling price on both would add a lot more insight also. Many ebooks sell for 99p.

Hi Corey T. We've provided more analysis here: http://www.thebookseller.com/news/news-analysis-what-amazon-numbers-real...

Shame it's behind a paywall Katie...

The results are impressive and reaffirm once again Amazon's leadership as ebook seller in UK.

The numbers however need to be taken with a grain of salt:
-114 Unit Sales (ebook) vs 100 Unit Sales (book) refers to sold copies  and not to revenue. There are half million ebooks on sale on Amazon.co.uk priced below or at 3.99 GBP, and many are below 1.00 GBP.
-half year results are generelly more biased in favor of eBooks, because in Jan and Feb many new Kindle Owners (who got their Kindle for Xmas) tend to buy a lot of titles to fill their devices.. After the first phase of over enthusiasm they tend to buy a more regular number of ebooks.
- sold eBooks don't necessarely mean read eBooks. It's something that happens also for pbook, but the ratios are even more evident in the case of eBooks. There is much more impulse buy (due for example to a Kindle deal or a special promotion) than there is on pbook Sales. In the long run it still to be proved if Kindle readers will keep buying so many ebooks just for the sake of buying and not reading them. We are still in a very young market stage.

-Amazon's apparent quicker growth in UK than in US is a comparison that is very arguable and can't be used as ultimate necessary consequence that UK readers appreciate Kindle more than US readers. 
-Amazon's pbook market share is not the same in the two countries.
-in UK ebook market lacks of successful alternative to Kindle, as there might be in US. (BKS missing in UK is an example thereof). Therefore Amazon's market share of eBooks is to be assumned way stronger in UK that it is in US.

Now It should be clear that a comparison, between US and UK based on the time ebook sales match pbook sales for one sole retailer (Amazon) and not for the market overall, is bound to need some more evidence in the best case.
And we are not considering the fact that Kindle in 2007, when Amazon launched it in US, was less sophisticaed and rich than the versions it launched in UK in 2010... And not to mention Kindle Apps for iPad, Android, and so on... Which were added only in the recent years.

Said that congrats to Amazon for delivering such impressive results.

Marcello Vena
@marcellovena