News

Indies ready e-books and reprints after Booker fillip

The smaller publishers whose titles have been selected for the Man Booker longlist, including Seren Books, Sandstone Press and Oneworld, are preparing to reprint the titles and release digital versions to meet the anticipated increased demand.

Seren Books publisher Mick Felton, whose title The Last Hundred Days by Patrick McGuinness made the longlist, said he couldn't comment on print runs as they are "fairly modest", but said: "We're hoping it will be a big boost to sales." In terms of making the title available as an e-book, he added: "We're looking into it - we are with Faber Factory so they are going to be getting busy on our behalf."

Felton added it has had interest from the US and Holland already for foreign rights, and said the publisher was at the moment planning to publish McGuinness next in their psychogeography series Real in 2013. He is also working on a collection of poetry for Carcanet Press.

At Oneworld, publisher of Yvette Edwards' A Cupboard Full of Coats, the initial UK print run was 6,000, with a reprint now under discussion. The mass-market paperback was due to be published in September, but this may now be moved forward. The e-book edition is already under production and “should be out in a few weeks”.

Meanwhile, m.d. of Scottish publisher Sandstone Press Robert Davidson, which publishes Jane Rogers' The Testament of Jessie Lamb, said: "We are delighted." The initial print run of the title was 3,000, but he said: "We've seen an immediate surge in sales this afternoon. We will be thinking of a reprint next week. I've only known about this for a couple of hours!"

He said Waterstone's has now taken it on as a UK-wide 3-for-2 title, the first time the chain has put a Sandstone Press title into a UK promotion. The publisher is also working on releasing the title as an e-book within three weeks, with interest having "risen off the dial".  Davidson said: "Amazon called me to ask me when it would be published as an e-book. That doesn't happen everyday." He added the publisher did not "yet" have any other titles signed by Rogers.

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Congratulations to the small indie presses. Small is beautiful!
My 'Just Us Two' travel series books are in e-book formats and the new Lifelong Learning:Personal Effectiveness Guides will follow on publication of print format in September.
The way to go I believe as it gives a wider choice.

The longlist was indeed great news, but surely there's a flipside in that whilst it may provide a much needed and deserved sales boost, many of these moves on the publishers' part will be a bid to recoup the costs of being long/shortlisted, which as a portion of the turnover of presses like this are huge.

I am delighted small publishers are pleased but they know they must both have all their ammunition ready to fire at the same time as exercising caution. It would also be good if we had some 'I am delighted' comments from the authors themselves - they and their books, not the publishers, are what this is all about.

I think judges should take a step back and refrain from commenting, to be honest. But as Susan Hill is, can I just say that in a year of stunning fiction, this is a very mediocre, disappointing longlist, narrow in international scope, light on seriously good prose writing, and more in tune with the populism of the Costas than the high literary standards of the Booker. And yes, these things do matter.

I am indeed delighted! JESSIE LAMB was a completely different kind of book for me to write, pitched into the future, restricted to a single and simple narrative voice, honing in on one specific act of heroism. It has been hugely cut and revised, and represents over 4 years' work. Until yesterday's longlist announcement, I thought it was likely to sink without trace, since it had only 3 reviews, and was barely visible in bookshops. This longlisting means it will be read - I am deeply grateful to the judges, and also honoured to be in the company of my fellow long-listees.

"can I just say that in a year of stunning fiction, this is a very mediocre, disappointing longlist, narrow in international scope, light on seriously good prose writing, and more in tune with the populism of the Costas than the high literary standards of the Booker."

A grand & sweeping statement, Medi. Two questions for you -

1) how many of the thirteen have you actually read?

2) which titles should be on the longlist instead, in your opinion?

1) ten out of thirteen read. Holinghurst, Barnes, deWitt good inclusions

2) John Burnside, A Summer of Drowning, Sanjeev Sahota, Ours Are the Streets, Thamina Ammam, The Good Muslim, AL Kennedy, The Blue Book, Ross Raisin, Waterline, Rahul Bhattacharya, The Sly Company of People Who Care, Edward St Aubyn, At Last, Anne Enright, The Forgotten Waltz, Jeremy Chambers, The Vintage and the Gleaning, David Miller, Today, Teju Cole, Open City, Jane Harris, Gillespie and I, Ali Smith, There but For The.

Wow. Will any longlisted author who doesn't show their gratitude not be shortlisted I wonder.

And then there's the small publishers who turn into giants publishers due to eBooks like United Writers Publications.

This eBook boom is crazy.

Congratulations to the small indie presses. Small is beautiful!
My 'Just Us Two' travel series books are in e-book formats and the new Lifelong Learning:Personal Effectiveness Guides will follow on publication of print format in September.
The way to go I believe as it gives a wider choice.

The longlist was indeed great news, but surely there's a flipside in that whilst it may provide a much needed and deserved sales boost, many of these moves on the publishers' part will be a bid to recoup the costs of being long/shortlisted, which as a portion of the turnover of presses like this are huge.

I am delighted small publishers are pleased but they know they must both have all their ammunition ready to fire at the same time as exercising caution. It would also be good if we had some 'I am delighted' comments from the authors themselves - they and their books, not the publishers, are what this is all about.

I am indeed delighted! JESSIE LAMB was a completely different kind of book for me to write, pitched into the future, restricted to a single and simple narrative voice, honing in on one specific act of heroism. It has been hugely cut and revised, and represents over 4 years' work. Until yesterday's longlist announcement, I thought it was likely to sink without trace, since it had only 3 reviews, and was barely visible in bookshops. This longlisting means it will be read - I am deeply grateful to the judges, and also honoured to be in the company of my fellow long-listees.

Wow. Will any longlisted author who doesn't show their gratitude not be shortlisted I wonder.

I think judges should take a step back and refrain from commenting, to be honest. But as Susan Hill is, can I just say that in a year of stunning fiction, this is a very mediocre, disappointing longlist, narrow in international scope, light on seriously good prose writing, and more in tune with the populism of the Costas than the high literary standards of the Booker. And yes, these things do matter.

"can I just say that in a year of stunning fiction, this is a very mediocre, disappointing longlist, narrow in international scope, light on seriously good prose writing, and more in tune with the populism of the Costas than the high literary standards of the Booker."

A grand & sweeping statement, Medi. Two questions for you -

1) how many of the thirteen have you actually read?

2) which titles should be on the longlist instead, in your opinion?

1) ten out of thirteen read. Holinghurst, Barnes, deWitt good inclusions

2) John Burnside, A Summer of Drowning, Sanjeev Sahota, Ours Are the Streets, Thamina Ammam, The Good Muslim, AL Kennedy, The Blue Book, Ross Raisin, Waterline, Rahul Bhattacharya, The Sly Company of People Who Care, Edward St Aubyn, At Last, Anne Enright, The Forgotten Waltz, Jeremy Chambers, The Vintage and the Gleaning, David Miller, Today, Teju Cole, Open City, Jane Harris, Gillespie and I, Ali Smith, There but For The.

And then there's the small publishers who turn into giants publishers due to eBooks like United Writers Publications.

This eBook boom is crazy.