News

Government to launch 2013 anti-piracy campaign

The government is to launch a campaign to educate consumers about the harm of illegal downloading, business secretary Vince Cable has announced.

The government will also work with key partners, such as the city of London police, to tackle IP crime including online piracy.

The measures were announced at a speech at The Big Innovation Centre, and are said to involve "a step change in the way the Intellectual Property Office (IPO) delivers services".

Cable said: "Our creativity, our openness to and talent for innovation, is a key pillar of our return to robust growth. So it is right we work to create the environment in which creative, innovative businesses of all shapes and sizes flourish... A vital part of this is making sure the intellectual property landscape encourages and cements success and growth."

The national consumer campaign to ensure consumers understand the use and value of intellectual property will be launched in spring 2013. The activity will focus on young people, in schools, theme parks and on the web, to educate them about their responsibilities in downloading materials.

The UK will also host an IP enforcement summit next summer.

Other related measures include the launch of a fast patent processing service and faster trade marks examination service.

Comments: Scroll down for the latest comments and to have your say

By posting on this website you agree to the Bookseller comments policy. Comments go direct to live please be relevant, brief and definitely not abusive. Report any "unsuitable comments by clicking the links"

Will the government produce any evidence as to the harm caused by piracy (or copyright infringement, which is I think what we're talking about here.) Not that I necessarily think it's harmless, but it would be good to have some notion of the actual extent of it.

I once asked Richard Mollett if any risk assessment had been done as part of his lobbying efforts to get the Digital Economy Act passed. He replied that any such assessment would be the responsibility of government. Thus, a law was rammed through parliament on no credible evidence.

If we are going to spend lots of money on PR campaigns and copyright enforcement efforts, and lots of effort gumming up the works of the internet and people's computers in order to make it harder to do stuff with, I feel we should at least be working from some kind of data, rather than a gut feeling.

Will the government produce any evidence as to the harm caused by piracy (or copyright infringement, which is I think what we're talking about here.) Not that I necessarily think it's harmless, but it would be good to have some notion of the actual extent of it.

I once asked Richard Mollett if any risk assessment had been done as part of his lobbying efforts to get the Digital Economy Act passed. He replied that any such assessment would be the responsibility of government. Thus, a law was rammed through parliament on no credible evidence.

If we are going to spend lots of money on PR campaigns and copyright enforcement efforts, and lots of effort gumming up the works of the internet and people's computers in order to make it harder to do stuff with, I feel we should at least be working from some kind of data, rather than a gut feeling.