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Digital helps lift profit at Simon & Schuster

Digital sales were worth 18% of Simon & Schuster's total global sales in its first quarter as its revenues increased 2% to $155m. Digital revenue more than doubled to $27.9m (£16.9m) from the first quarter in 2010, with e-book sales in the UK also growing fast, now 3% of revenue.

S&S' digital figures come a day after Hachette revealed e-books accounted for 22% of sales in the US during its first quarter. In the UK, Hachette e-books were worth more than 5% of trade sales.

For the three months to 31st March, Simon & Schuster's operating income before debt and amortisation (OIBDA) more than doubled to $7m. The publisher said it was driven by lower shipping, production and returns costs because of the increase in digital sales.

The results did not strip out UK figures. According to Nielsen BookScan figures, S&S UK sales were up 11% to £5.9m in its first quarter.  Leslie Mooves, president and c.e.o. of S&S parent CBS Corporation, said: "Across the board, this was an exceptionally strong quarter for CBS, giving us a tremendous start in 2011." Overall, CBS sales were down 1% to $3.51bn and OIBDA was up 64% to $576m.

Reidy told Publishers Marketplace that e-book sales in the UK were in the range of 3% of sales on average. The company was up 13% in the first quarter in UK, while the children's division was up more than 14%.

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An interesting strategy. Print books get pirated too. Perhaps the best way to prevent all piracy is to simply give up writing altogether. An equally senseless proposition.

I am very sorry to see that people still deniying the undenyable. E-books are a reality as piracy is, an editor does not have the luxury to not publish e-books or to repeat the same mistakes that the music industry did.

Instead o stucking your head in the sand and pretend that it´s not happening why don´t you stop preaching in the desert and help to find a business model that could make piracy less profitable.

Remember, if are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

There isn't a single example of a commodity made available electronically that hasn't been abused by pirates (and consumers) to the degree it has a seismic impact on the original producer.
We're at the very beginning of the inevitable Ebook revolution and the uncomfortable truth is that there is no viable security solution for publishers - if there was the music and film business would have implemented it.

A doubling of income in just 3 months is something to celebrate indeed!

We are witnessing the first real changes brought about by the e-book revolution. And if you put this together with the evidence coming in from a recent survey of California e-reader owners is correct - and there's no reason to doubt it - that shows people "read more" after they've bought an e-reader, this only means that Simon and Schuster, Hachette and other Big Publishers are finally headed towards greener, happier pastures!

Ah, if only they would ride the wave, stop worrying and treat writers better! After all, e-books like any other book have to be written by somebody...

Are we naming authors who've been pirated?

Or authors that have had HUGE success giving their work away? Personally, I think the later is most important. That list includes Cory Doctorow, Paolo Coehlo and many other best sellers. As for music, free giveaways boosted Paul Simon's new album, Janus Ian, Pink and many, many others.

So what are you talking about here? You haven't listed any actual numbers, statistics or names of people who've been injured by piracy. Do you have those? I personally doubt they exist because most authors insist pirating helps sell their work.

As an author and a publisher, I think it's awesome when people read my work. I love it if people share it, pass it around. In fact, it's been a boon to selling my work in paperback and other eformats.

The world's changed Matt. Maybe you should join us.

Wrong.

I can point you to Neil Gaiman, who saw a spike in sales by distributing his book American Gods for free.

I can point you to O'Reilly and Baen who have provided non-DRMed eBooks for YEARS. And Baen gives a ton of them away for free.

I can point you to Steve Leiber who posted an awesome graphic of sales on his graphic novel Underground. Reviews on Boing Boing? Small gain. Posted onto 4chan? Instant spike in sales.

See also: Paulo Coelho.

You know what leads to instant piracy: not providing a legitimate way for people to purchase the eBook. Google Harry Potter. No eBook. Yet the internet still has it.

With digital readership on the rise, authors and publishers who are flexible in remarketing and distributing their works will likely face less barriers to profitability then those who remain stuck in their ways.

While the reading of books is a personal endeavor, it can also be a very social activity. Creating a buzz in the name of interest, and not profit, can be a great way to reach a wide audience. This may include book sharing or a pay what you want model. The digital sphere rewards and appreciates creativity. Profitability in the short term is nice, but is no comparison to having a brand with loyal readers.

Are we naming authors who've been pirated?

Or authors that have had HUGE success giving their work away? Personally, I think the later is most important. That list includes Cory Doctorow, Paolo Coehlo and many other best sellers. As for music, free giveaways boosted Paul Simon's new album, Janus Ian, Pink and many, many others.

So what are you talking about here? You haven't listed any actual numbers, statistics or names of people who've been injured by piracy. Do you have those? I personally doubt they exist because most authors insist pirating helps sell their work.

As an author and a publisher, I think it's awesome when people read my work. I love it if people share it, pass it around. In fact, it's been a boon to selling my work in paperback and other eformats.

The world's changed Matt. Maybe you should join us.

With digital readership on the rise, authors and publishers who are flexible in remarketing and distributing their works will likely face less barriers to profitability then those who remain stuck in their ways.

While the reading of books is a personal endeavor, it can also be a very social activity. Creating a buzz in the name of interest, and not profit, can be a great way to reach a wide audience. This may include book sharing or a pay what you want model. The digital sphere rewards and appreciates creativity. Profitability in the short term is nice, but is no comparison to having a brand with loyal readers.

Wrong.

I can point you to Neil Gaiman, who saw a spike in sales by distributing his book American Gods for free.

I can point you to O'Reilly and Baen who have provided non-DRMed eBooks for YEARS. And Baen gives a ton of them away for free.

I can point you to Steve Leiber who posted an awesome graphic of sales on his graphic novel Underground. Reviews on Boing Boing? Small gain. Posted onto 4chan? Instant spike in sales.

See also: Paulo Coelho.

You know what leads to instant piracy: not providing a legitimate way for people to purchase the eBook. Google Harry Potter. No eBook. Yet the internet still has it.

An interesting strategy. Print books get pirated too. Perhaps the best way to prevent all piracy is to simply give up writing altogether. An equally senseless proposition.

I am very sorry to see that people still deniying the undenyable. E-books are a reality as piracy is, an editor does not have the luxury to not publish e-books or to repeat the same mistakes that the music industry did.

Instead o stucking your head in the sand and pretend that it´s not happening why don´t you stop preaching in the desert and help to find a business model that could make piracy less profitable.

Remember, if are not part of the solution, you are part of the problem.

There isn't a single example of a commodity made available electronically that hasn't been abused by pirates (and consumers) to the degree it has a seismic impact on the original producer.
We're at the very beginning of the inevitable Ebook revolution and the uncomfortable truth is that there is no viable security solution for publishers - if there was the music and film business would have implemented it.

A doubling of income in just 3 months is something to celebrate indeed!

We are witnessing the first real changes brought about by the e-book revolution. And if you put this together with the evidence coming in from a recent survey of California e-reader owners is correct - and there's no reason to doubt it - that shows people "read more" after they've bought an e-reader, this only means that Simon and Schuster, Hachette and other Big Publishers are finally headed towards greener, happier pastures!

Ah, if only they would ride the wave, stop worrying and treat writers better! After all, e-books like any other book have to be written by somebody...