Decline in US print book sales offset by rise in e

Decline in US print book sales offset by rise in e

<p>Sales of print books tracked by Nielsen BookScan in the US fell by 4.4% in the year to 26th December 2010, a shortfall which US site<em> Publishers Marketplace </em>reckons will have been made up by growth in e-book sales, which are not yet tracked by this Nielsen measure.<br /><br />Unlike the UK, Nielsen does not show the value of those sales, but the data found that the US trade sold 702 million books over the 51-week period. <em>Publishers Marketplace </em>reports: &quot;With ebook sales at the major reporting houses rising from roughly 3% a year ago to approximately 9% or more in dollars (and likely even more by units) by the end of this year it&#39;s likely that the decline in print sales was more than outpaced by the gain in ebook sales.&quot;<br /><br />Traditional booksellers lost marketshare over the year to a category defined by Nielsen as &quot;discount &amp; others&quot;, with the former shrinking by 12.3% and the latter rising by 11.5%.<br /><br />Hardback sales were almost flat, declining by less than 1.4%, while trade paperbacks fell 2.9%, with the biggest impact in mass market paperbacks, which fell 13%. PM notes that the small decline in hardback sales would be welcomed by those publishers concerned about encroaching e-book sales, while the fall in mass market paperback sales disproportionately impacted by the closure of &quot;hundreds of mall-based stores&quot; by the likes of Barnes &amp; Noble, and Borders.<br /></p>