News

British Library attacked for Amazon link

The British Library has come under fire from booksellers for including a link to online giant Amazon.co.uk on entries in its public online catalogue. The catalogue lists more than 13 million items in the British Library's collection, detailing the library's cataloguing details in each case, together with general information on each book. There is also a final field, "This item in Amazon.co.uk", on each record. This field links directly to the relevant page on Amazon, where the book can be bought. If the title is not among Amazon's stock, the page offers "More titles to consider" instead.

A spokesperson for the British Library said it was currently piloting a link to Amazon on its Integrated Catalogue "with the aim of providing users with the choice of an alternative method of obtaining a title if, for some reason, it is not available in the Library's Reading Rooms."

Waterstone's m.d. James Daunt criticised the development, saying: "It's disappointing to say the least that a very British institution is driving readers away from local libraries and high street bookshops. In an environment where high street booksellers and libraries face huge pressures, it is a shame that the British Library choose to give their endorsement to one aggressively commercial organisation."

Johnny de Falbe, co-owner of London's Sandoe bookshop, commented: "The British Library, a public institution, should not be offering this link to Amazon, which is not (last I heard) a public institution. And if the British Library, of all people, are not supporting British bookshops, and positively steering business away from independents, then why should anyone else have any faith, or interest, in independents?"

De Falbe said he believed there was an "insidious undermining" of the idea of bookshops that threatened independents more than the existence of Kindles or Amazon itself. "The British Library takes it for granted that it's okay to put up this link to Amazon, and indeed that it is helpful. They take it for granted that people looking something up on their catalogue will prefer to shop online, at Amazon, rather than go to a bookshop," he said.

The British Library spokesperson said its link was to Amazon rather than other booksellers because this was provided as a pre-built generic link coming with the Primo software supplied by ExLibris, the search engine behind the library's website that also powers its online integrated catalogue. The spokesperson denied that the library was making any revenue out of the arrangement and added: "The library is currently reviewing the success of this service."
 

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This is bad in a number of ways, true it gives an unfair advantage to one highly commercial company and is bad for independent bookshops. However if the BL feel they must do this it is even worse that the public purse makes no gain from this. If they feel that this provides any kind of service to their users they should find a more generic source and seek firm advantages for the institution. The fund holders of the BL need to really question this decision.

This link has been visible on the BL inegrated catalogue web pages for many months ; I'm surprised that it hasn't been highlighted before.

Sadly, also, many local librarians choose to refer customers to Amazon rather than their local bookshops ; but that is all another matter.

Mmmm, what about public libraries who promote Amazon on their websites? What about independents who have a sales channel via Amazon? I like James Daunt, especially with his obvious love of bookselling, but I'm not sure his unrelenting hatred of Amazon is particularly helpful. Plenty of people do and will continue to use Amazon, precisely because it provides a fantastic service.
Surely, the emphasis should be on rebuilding Waterstone's as a booklover's destination of choice and promoting independents as places of bookish delights, which are vital to the cultural fabric of our country. The recent guide to the creme of independent bookshops that the Guardian recently produced was excellent. I was very pleased to see The Hours Cafe and Bookshop in Brecon featured in this.
And with a government in situ seemingly intent on destroying the public library service, such as has happened to Brent libraries, then who can blame libraries for linking to Amazon or any other sites for that matter, in the hope of generating extra revenue?
As applies to anything in life, if a brilliant service is offered, then people will remain loyal and use it.

This is a disgrace! The link should be directed straight to the BA list of Members in that way ensuring that the vast majority of booksellers get a 'look in' and more importantly the public get a choice and find out where their local bricks and mortar bookshop is to be found. As a publisher who has by law to provide free copies of every title to the national libraries, (which I have always believed was in part to support the whole UK book trade), and as a tax payer helping to pay for the British Library I feel a link to just one source of supply is just not on.

'The British Library spokesperson said its link was to Amazon rather than other booksellers because this was provided as a pre-built generic link coming with the Primo software supplied by ExLibris, the search engine behind the library's website that also powers its online integrated catalogue.'

Sorry this simply should not wash the choice of software should perhaps have taken account of this and or been amended to include other booksellers - when will we wake up and smell the coffee?

On the comment regarding 'brilliant service' surely the point here is that while Amazon are being given the opportunity to serve, the many hundreds of other bookshops are perhaps not. Britain's bookshops surely deserve better from a national institution.

Computer said Amazon. A poor, poor excuse, though I've heard it before.

I notice that the BL webpages are not linked on the above report.

Click on "Search the Integrated Catalogue"

http://catalogue.bl.uk/F/?func=file&file_name=login-bl-list

In my opinion the catalogue should not favour or link to any bookseller or group - it has worked very well for many years in its "plain" style. (I might add that colleagues worldwide use it as back up reference to normal volumes of bibliography)

I wonder if there is a wider point here that goes beyond bookselling but nonetheless signals a worrying trend for public service organisations to roll over and wave their legs in the air for the lowest common denominator online presence. It is not about providing a service but an easy cheap way of the public entity appearing to be 'connected' to new media and the everyday world of the internet.

Has nobody noticed how often BBC programmes - particularly on radio point their listeners to 'our Facebook page'. Like Amazon, Facebook is a commercial monster that does not necessarily provide the best or most subtle service. Like Amazon, Facebook benefits from the profile and the increased user traffic that it derives through a recommendation by a publicly funded bodied. Like Amazon, Facebook collects commercially useful data from its users. Will the NHS websites soon be pointing to SuperDrug or Boots ? Same principle but I guess it would make a lot more noise.

The sometime quaint sounding formula 'available at a good bookshop near you' has fallen out of fashion but it might be time to bring it back ?

It seems odd that many authors also have 'buy my books on Amazon' links on their own websites when users could buy from their publisher.

Major development I have noticed this evening.

Surprise, surprise the links to amazon have been withdrawn and bibliographic page data returns for ISBN titles now merely give a clickable cover image with stock Bowker data.

Thanks to TheBookseller and Benedicte Page for highlighting this story.

Libraries link to Amazon for a variety of reasons other than simply offering a route to buy a copy of a book. Amazon frequently includes images of the book cover (front and back), tables of contents, book reviews, suggested related titles and sample content. This is the online equivalent of browsing in a library or bookshop but with added features. It is worth noting that most library users are prolific book buyers. Publishers and booksellers need to espouse the online world rather than criticise libraries for doing so.

The Bat Says: If Amazon pays taxes in the UK then it has a much right as any UK tax-generating company to be promoted by the BM...however, if it pays no UK taxes....

I don't think anyone was criticising libraries for espousing the online world, or indeed for having a route to Amazon this is about providing readers/visitors with MORE choice not less. Amazon provide an excellent service including the elements you mention. However the cover images and title information details are supplied by publishers to a number of databases - Nielsen, Bowker etc These databases provide the information for large numbers of booksellers and Amazon are not alone in having such details and more available to online browsers. I agree with you that library links are not just about a route to buy a book, but as they are funded with taxpayers money and are there to serve our intellectual needs, they should surely provide the widest possible choice. How would it be if libraries just had one publishers books on their shelves?

I do believe the Bookseller's Association should consider taking a stronger lead here by promoting easy on line access to the excellent directory of members. This would provide browsers with considerable further benefits and importantly support booksellers.

The Bat says: Oops! I meant the BL not the BM...in fact, any library or museum paid for out of UK taxes.

The link was likely put in as doing so is technically trivial, given an identifier like an ISBN.

Amazon have been winning (won?) the online book selling game for some time now, and it is mainly due to the sheer ease of with which you can use or make use of their services as the BL have done here.

Perhaps the question should be, why isn't linking to local bookshops or libraries as easy as this? (Rhetorical)

it's just as nauseating when authors choose to highlight Amazon.

Bookbat - what are you talking about, of course amazon pay tax in the UK.
Clive - given that you knew the links had been visible for months ( although they haven't of course ), why didn't you highlight it instead of waiting for The Bookseller to do so ? You are normally so astute in your offerings on here, think you missed a trick there to once more assert your bookselling wisdom.

It is a side issue, raised by BookBat, but Amazon legally avoid many of their UK tax liabilities (and disclosure requirements) by being registered in Luxembourg

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/richardfletcher/8745314/Is-th...

"It is impossible to say for certain exactly how much corporation tax Amazon.com pays (or doesn't pay) in the UK – and the internet retailer refuses to disclose the figure. But an analysis of filings at Companies House reveals that in 2010 its largest UK subsidiary, Amazon.co.uk paid zero, zilch, nothing. As it did the year before and the year before that.

In fact, the last time Amazon.com appeared to write a cheque for corporation tax was in 2007 when it handed over the less than princely sum of £19,367 to the Inland Revenue. The retailer does of course pay National Insurance, business rates and VAT in the UK.

So how does the internet giant do it? Well, while Amazon may package and send the vast majority of its UK orders from its giant distribution centre in Milton Keynes – where it employs more than 2,000 people – Amazon.co.uk is a "service company" rather than a retailer, providing fulfilment, marketing and support services to a Luxembourg-based parent.

That means that while it may be Amazon.co.uk that sends UK customers that discounted copy of How to Win Friends and Influence People it will be Luxembourg-based Amazon Eu Sarl that collects the £6.19.

It's a structure that (presumably) means Amazon books its profits in Luxembourg, which has a lower corporation tax rate than the UK, although it is impossible to know for sure. It is not just tax rates that are lower in Luxembourg – so are levels of disclosure. There is no requirement for Amazon Eu Sarl to publish annual accounts, unlike Amazon.co.uk."

I consider the bibliographic catalogue details at BL, LOC et alia are sacrosanct, they should be as input by the cataloguer and not have additional data or links away from page.

Amazon cataloguing is dependent upon SKU (stock keeping unit) and ASIN (amazon standard identification numbers) in pre ISBN titles it assigns an ASIN to a listing where the standard and accuracy of any details will be dependent upon the knowledge and accuracy of the lister (subject to the constraints of the amazon system).

As to "Bobby big nuts" querying why I did not previously raise this BL catalogue change sooner, although I have discussed the problem with colleagues in the antiquarian and collectable trade, I suspect that it would have taken somebody far more powerful (within the trade) than a rural Somerset bookseller to get the issue featured prominently on TheBookseller. Unless I'm mistaken the wording on the amazon hyperlink went through several changes in the past few months.

A little quick research via Google will reveal that as recently as 2009 ExLibrisGroup were considering the benefits of a marketing tie-up with Amazon.

http://igelu.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/el-qa-2009.pdf

" 29. Business partners
In URM acquisition “module” there is a button planned to directly send an order to amazon.com. Is amazon an Ex Libris business partner? Does Ex Libris head out for any partnerships with the “global players”?

Nancy (Dushkin): Ex Libris is looking at business partners on a global basis. Susan Stearns is responsible for strategic partnerships for the URM. Too early to say who Ex Libris is talking to. Amazon is not a business partner at the moment, but looking at them is a pretty good idea! "

Ethical standards surely demand that there should be some clear transparency about any financial benefits for either party - be it British Library or ExLibrisGroup - were the Amazon hyperlinks ever to be re-instated on the BL Integrated Catalogue webpage returns.

Perhaps Amazon is thinking of purchasing the British Library. They already own the following:

Abebooks - Canadian and German based onluine market for mostly used and rare books
Bibliofind - Former on line multi-dealer site purchased and absorbed by Amazon
Book Depository - a UK-based online book seller.
Bookfinder - Index of books for sale on multiple online venues
Bookpages - Internet bookstore based in the United Kingdom acquired and absorbed by Amazon
Booksurge - Publishing service recently merged with Amazon owned CreateSpace
Booktour - Recently closed Amazon funded start-up used by authors and publishers to publicize book signings, readings and other live events
Chrislands - a company that hosts websites for over 1000 booksellers
CreateSpace - self-publishing site for authors, filmmakers and musicians
FillZ - Inventory management system for sellers of books, music, videos and games
Gojaba - a marketplace for books targeted at customers in Russia, Sweden, Brazil and Poland.
IberLibro - an online catalogue of Spanish and Portuguese modern, used, and antiquarian books
Justbooks - former German based online multidealer site
Lexcycle - a software company that makes electronic book reading software
LibraryThing (40 %) - a social cataloging web application for storing and sharing book catalogs
Shelfari - a social cataloging website for bookreaders to build virtual bookshelves of the titles they own or have read, and can rate, review, tag, and discuss their books
Telebook (www.telebuch.de) - former German online bookstore
ZVAB - a Germany-based online marketplace for collectors of rare books

Does anyone know of a petition we can sign to put the British Library under pressure to review their decision?

This is bad in a number of ways, true it gives an unfair advantage to one highly commercial company and is bad for independent bookshops. However if the BL feel they must do this it is even worse that the public purse makes no gain from this. If they feel that this provides any kind of service to their users they should find a more generic source and seek firm advantages for the institution. The fund holders of the BL need to really question this decision.

This link has been visible on the BL inegrated catalogue web pages for many months ; I'm surprised that it hasn't been highlighted before.

Sadly, also, many local librarians choose to refer customers to Amazon rather than their local bookshops ; but that is all another matter.

Mmmm, what about public libraries who promote Amazon on their websites? What about independents who have a sales channel via Amazon? I like James Daunt, especially with his obvious love of bookselling, but I'm not sure his unrelenting hatred of Amazon is particularly helpful. Plenty of people do and will continue to use Amazon, precisely because it provides a fantastic service.
Surely, the emphasis should be on rebuilding Waterstone's as a booklover's destination of choice and promoting independents as places of bookish delights, which are vital to the cultural fabric of our country. The recent guide to the creme of independent bookshops that the Guardian recently produced was excellent. I was very pleased to see The Hours Cafe and Bookshop in Brecon featured in this.
And with a government in situ seemingly intent on destroying the public library service, such as has happened to Brent libraries, then who can blame libraries for linking to Amazon or any other sites for that matter, in the hope of generating extra revenue?
As applies to anything in life, if a brilliant service is offered, then people will remain loyal and use it.

Alexis -
What extra revenue?
" then who can blame libraries for linking to Amazon or any other sites for that matter, in the hope of generating extra revenue?"

Today's Independent - "A spokesman for the library said the new system was at a pilot stage. The software purchased for the new search function can LINK ONLY TO AMAZON, but the library insists IT DOES NOT MAKE ANY REVENUE FROM THE REDIRECT".
This is so wrong on so many levels - Who sanctioned search software that only links to a single vendor, a virtual malignant monopoly. Why should taxpayer funds be used to push business to Amazon. Librarians should support local bookstores and the British Library even more so.

If it's at pilot stage let the British Library know how the industry feels and have the search opened out to all bookstores.

Surely we aren't going to let books lose the cultural importance and status to become commodotised like beans>

This is a disgrace! The link should be directed straight to the BA list of Members in that way ensuring that the vast majority of booksellers get a 'look in' and more importantly the public get a choice and find out where their local bricks and mortar bookshop is to be found. As a publisher who has by law to provide free copies of every title to the national libraries, (which I have always believed was in part to support the whole UK book trade), and as a tax payer helping to pay for the British Library I feel a link to just one source of supply is just not on.

'The British Library spokesperson said its link was to Amazon rather than other booksellers because this was provided as a pre-built generic link coming with the Primo software supplied by ExLibris, the search engine behind the library's website that also powers its online integrated catalogue.'

Sorry this simply should not wash the choice of software should perhaps have taken account of this and or been amended to include other booksellers - when will we wake up and smell the coffee?

On the comment regarding 'brilliant service' surely the point here is that while Amazon are being given the opportunity to serve, the many hundreds of other bookshops are perhaps not. Britain's bookshops surely deserve better from a national institution.

Computer said Amazon. A poor, poor excuse, though I've heard it before.

I notice that the BL webpages are not linked on the above report.

Click on "Search the Integrated Catalogue"

http://catalogue.bl.uk/F/?func=file&file_name=login-bl-list

In my opinion the catalogue should not favour or link to any bookseller or group - it has worked very well for many years in its "plain" style. (I might add that colleagues worldwide use it as back up reference to normal volumes of bibliography)

I wonder if there is a wider point here that goes beyond bookselling but nonetheless signals a worrying trend for public service organisations to roll over and wave their legs in the air for the lowest common denominator online presence. It is not about providing a service but an easy cheap way of the public entity appearing to be 'connected' to new media and the everyday world of the internet.

Has nobody noticed how often BBC programmes - particularly on radio point their listeners to 'our Facebook page'. Like Amazon, Facebook is a commercial monster that does not necessarily provide the best or most subtle service. Like Amazon, Facebook benefits from the profile and the increased user traffic that it derives through a recommendation by a publicly funded bodied. Like Amazon, Facebook collects commercially useful data from its users. Will the NHS websites soon be pointing to SuperDrug or Boots ? Same principle but I guess it would make a lot more noise.

The sometime quaint sounding formula 'available at a good bookshop near you' has fallen out of fashion but it might be time to bring it back ?

It seems odd that many authors also have 'buy my books on Amazon' links on their own websites when users could buy from their publisher.

it's just as nauseating when authors choose to highlight Amazon.

Major development I have noticed this evening.

Surprise, surprise the links to amazon have been withdrawn and bibliographic page data returns for ISBN titles now merely give a clickable cover image with stock Bowker data.

Thanks to TheBookseller and Benedicte Page for highlighting this story.

Libraries link to Amazon for a variety of reasons other than simply offering a route to buy a copy of a book. Amazon frequently includes images of the book cover (front and back), tables of contents, book reviews, suggested related titles and sample content. This is the online equivalent of browsing in a library or bookshop but with added features. It is worth noting that most library users are prolific book buyers. Publishers and booksellers need to espouse the online world rather than criticise libraries for doing so.

I don't think anyone was criticising libraries for espousing the online world, or indeed for having a route to Amazon this is about providing readers/visitors with MORE choice not less. Amazon provide an excellent service including the elements you mention. However the cover images and title information details are supplied by publishers to a number of databases - Nielsen, Bowker etc These databases provide the information for large numbers of booksellers and Amazon are not alone in having such details and more available to online browsers. I agree with you that library links are not just about a route to buy a book, but as they are funded with taxpayers money and are there to serve our intellectual needs, they should surely provide the widest possible choice. How would it be if libraries just had one publishers books on their shelves?

I do believe the Bookseller's Association should consider taking a stronger lead here by promoting easy on line access to the excellent directory of members. This would provide browsers with considerable further benefits and importantly support booksellers.

I agree, this should not be about removing a link to a potentially useful source of information, more about adding links out to additional sites that will be of use to end users.

But what should they link out to, to provide users with information about holdings in public libraries, and local bookshops that stock?

The former is probably best catered for by Worldcat, but not all public libraries are on there, and it does involve a cost for the library.

I'm not sure anything exists for the latter? The only thing I can come up with is, well, Amazon, which allows third parties to list their items on its site. Is there a better option (for listing which bookshops contain a book, not just a list of bookshops)?

On a broader note, I do think institutions like the BL need to be allowed to innovate without a storm in a teacup brewing every time. And they must stay focused on providing useful services to end users.

Chris

The following link

http://tiny.cc/aid1b

Takes you to the BA Directory of members from where you can find hundreds of bookshops with their physical and web site address (if available). This is a good starting point, although the availability of this searchable resource could be promoted more widely. Publishers for example could be asked to feature this information on the inside back cover of soft backs...

The Bat Says: If Amazon pays taxes in the UK then it has a much right as any UK tax-generating company to be promoted by the BM...however, if it pays no UK taxes....

The Bat says: Oops! I meant the BL not the BM...in fact, any library or museum paid for out of UK taxes.

The link was likely put in as doing so is technically trivial, given an identifier like an ISBN.

Amazon have been winning (won?) the online book selling game for some time now, and it is mainly due to the sheer ease of with which you can use or make use of their services as the BL have done here.

Perhaps the question should be, why isn't linking to local bookshops or libraries as easy as this? (Rhetorical)

Bookbat - what are you talking about, of course amazon pay tax in the UK.
Clive - given that you knew the links had been visible for months ( although they haven't of course ), why didn't you highlight it instead of waiting for The Bookseller to do so ? You are normally so astute in your offerings on here, think you missed a trick there to once more assert your bookselling wisdom.

It is a side issue, raised by BookBat, but Amazon legally avoid many of their UK tax liabilities (and disclosure requirements) by being registered in Luxembourg

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/comment/richardfletcher/8745314/Is-th...

"It is impossible to say for certain exactly how much corporation tax Amazon.com pays (or doesn't pay) in the UK – and the internet retailer refuses to disclose the figure. But an analysis of filings at Companies House reveals that in 2010 its largest UK subsidiary, Amazon.co.uk paid zero, zilch, nothing. As it did the year before and the year before that.

In fact, the last time Amazon.com appeared to write a cheque for corporation tax was in 2007 when it handed over the less than princely sum of £19,367 to the Inland Revenue. The retailer does of course pay National Insurance, business rates and VAT in the UK.

So how does the internet giant do it? Well, while Amazon may package and send the vast majority of its UK orders from its giant distribution centre in Milton Keynes – where it employs more than 2,000 people – Amazon.co.uk is a "service company" rather than a retailer, providing fulfilment, marketing and support services to a Luxembourg-based parent.

That means that while it may be Amazon.co.uk that sends UK customers that discounted copy of How to Win Friends and Influence People it will be Luxembourg-based Amazon Eu Sarl that collects the £6.19.

It's a structure that (presumably) means Amazon books its profits in Luxembourg, which has a lower corporation tax rate than the UK, although it is impossible to know for sure. It is not just tax rates that are lower in Luxembourg – so are levels of disclosure. There is no requirement for Amazon Eu Sarl to publish annual accounts, unlike Amazon.co.uk."

I consider the bibliographic catalogue details at BL, LOC et alia are sacrosanct, they should be as input by the cataloguer and not have additional data or links away from page.

Amazon cataloguing is dependent upon SKU (stock keeping unit) and ASIN (amazon standard identification numbers) in pre ISBN titles it assigns an ASIN to a listing where the standard and accuracy of any details will be dependent upon the knowledge and accuracy of the lister (subject to the constraints of the amazon system).

As to "Bobby big nuts" querying why I did not previously raise this BL catalogue change sooner, although I have discussed the problem with colleagues in the antiquarian and collectable trade, I suspect that it would have taken somebody far more powerful (within the trade) than a rural Somerset bookseller to get the issue featured prominently on TheBookseller. Unless I'm mistaken the wording on the amazon hyperlink went through several changes in the past few months.

A little quick research via Google will reveal that as recently as 2009 ExLibrisGroup were considering the benefits of a marketing tie-up with Amazon.

http://igelu.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/el-qa-2009.pdf

" 29. Business partners
In URM acquisition “module” there is a button planned to directly send an order to amazon.com. Is amazon an Ex Libris business partner? Does Ex Libris head out for any partnerships with the “global players”?

Nancy (Dushkin): Ex Libris is looking at business partners on a global basis. Susan Stearns is responsible for strategic partnerships for the URM. Too early to say who Ex Libris is talking to. Amazon is not a business partner at the moment, but looking at them is a pretty good idea! "

Ethical standards surely demand that there should be some clear transparency about any financial benefits for either party - be it British Library or ExLibrisGroup - were the Amazon hyperlinks ever to be re-instated on the BL Integrated Catalogue webpage returns.

Clive,
I hear what you are saying, but it is somewhat at odds with where the internet, and metadata, is going. For example, on the BBC website, if you look at the page for a band or artist, the information is drawn in from other sources
(e.g. http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/6386ddff-0d13-4685-9f0a-a82bf022fb1c )

This allows the BBC to provide a useful service, with reduced cost.

If any Library in the UK is going to invest resources in to Cataloguing then the BL is probably it. But for years libraries have shared bibliographic records (to avoid re-inventing the wheel), pull in extended metadata (book images, ToC) from third parties, etc and the BL does the same.

If others provide additional information on a book (such as the full text for out-of-copyright works) then it would be crazy for the BL to try and re-create this themselves rather than point users to (or embed) third party content.

Chris

Perhaps Amazon is thinking of purchasing the British Library. They already own the following:

Abebooks - Canadian and German based onluine market for mostly used and rare books
Bibliofind - Former on line multi-dealer site purchased and absorbed by Amazon
Book Depository - a UK-based online book seller.
Bookfinder - Index of books for sale on multiple online venues
Bookpages - Internet bookstore based in the United Kingdom acquired and absorbed by Amazon
Booksurge - Publishing service recently merged with Amazon owned CreateSpace
Booktour - Recently closed Amazon funded start-up used by authors and publishers to publicize book signings, readings and other live events
Chrislands - a company that hosts websites for over 1000 booksellers
CreateSpace - self-publishing site for authors, filmmakers and musicians
FillZ - Inventory management system for sellers of books, music, videos and games
Gojaba - a marketplace for books targeted at customers in Russia, Sweden, Brazil and Poland.
IberLibro - an online catalogue of Spanish and Portuguese modern, used, and antiquarian books
Justbooks - former German based online multidealer site
Lexcycle - a software company that makes electronic book reading software
LibraryThing (40 %) - a social cataloging web application for storing and sharing book catalogs
Shelfari - a social cataloging website for bookreaders to build virtual bookshelves of the titles they own or have read, and can rate, review, tag, and discuss their books
Telebook (www.telebuch.de) - former German online bookstore
ZVAB - a Germany-based online marketplace for collectors of rare books

Does anyone know of a petition we can sign to put the British Library under pressure to review their decision?

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Promotion of Amazon is taking place even in a library? that is sad news, are they going to close up or running under loss to promote and it is so not right for a library to give advantages like this.I truely think that this issue must be considered.

Promotion of Amazon is taking place even in a library? that is sad news, are they going to close up or running under loss to promote and it is so not right for a library to give advantages like this.I truely think that this issue must be considered.

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