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Bertrams to launch online bookseller

UK book wholesaler Bertrams is teaming up with former Book Depository IT director Will Jones to found a new "independent online bookseller" called Wordery.

Wordery will start out trading on marketplaces, launching first on Play.com, and is looking to launch its own transactional consumer facing online site, www.wordery.com, next year.

Jones said: "The business has ambitious plans to become a leading marketplace retailer."

Bertrams will supply Wordery with titles and the company will sell physical books at competitive prices, aiming to compete with others in the market by offering sharp customer service to win market share.

Jones said: "The arrangement with Bertrams is simple. Wordery will lead with retailing and marketing expertise, Bertrams' role is to fulfil orders from their distribution centre. By sharing our respective skills we believe Wordery can become a significant new player in book retailing."

The company aims to trade on market places across the world and the consumer website when launched will serve an international customer base.

Graeme Underhill, managing director of Bertrams, said: "The venture with Wordery is part of our sales-led strategy, which recognises we need to seek opportunities and not wait for them to emerge."

Steve Potter, commercial manager for Wordery, will manage key relationships with suppliers and publishers and can be contacted at steve@wordery.com.

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About time but where does all this leave Bertrams in the long term? Does Bertrams have the clout of Amazon?
If not where is their future?

http://www.darcyblaze.com/

Terrific. Thank you so much Bertrams, on behalf of all your independent bookshop customers. Lovely move, showing your complete indifference to the interests of your traditional customers.

I for one will now shift more and more business away from Bertrams back to publishers.

Things that make you go hmmm. Retailing to the world with all that nice wholesale discount. No wonder Bertrams will discount aggressively. I wonder whether Amazon won't force publishers to cut those discounts - or raise Amazon's to the same level. We all kinda knew the wholesalers were at it on Marketplace but this is a bit more brazen, and opens all kinds of discussions about the supply chain.

I guess Berts had to do this as the market for supply through their current model is decreasing rapidly .

Normal supply chain etiquette has come to an end . Publishers are focussing heavily on supply to their ultimate customer direct and so Berts have to do the same. So long as the project delivers a net gain after upsetting some existing bookshop customers, and the inevitable attempt by publishers to reduce terms on such activities.

About time but where does all this leave Bertrams in the long term? Does Bertrams have the clout of Amazon?
If not where is their future?

http://www.darcyblaze.com/

Terrific. Thank you so much Bertrams, on behalf of all your independent bookshop customers. Lovely move, showing your complete indifference to the interests of your traditional customers.

I for one will now shift more and more business away from Bertrams back to publishers.

Things that make you go hmmm. Retailing to the world with all that nice wholesale discount. No wonder Bertrams will discount aggressively. I wonder whether Amazon won't force publishers to cut those discounts - or raise Amazon's to the same level. We all kinda knew the wholesalers were at it on Marketplace but this is a bit more brazen, and opens all kinds of discussions about the supply chain.

I guess Berts had to do this as the market for supply through their current model is decreasing rapidly .

Normal supply chain etiquette has come to an end . Publishers are focussing heavily on supply to their ultimate customer direct and so Berts have to do the same. So long as the project delivers a net gain after upsetting some existing bookshop customers, and the inevitable attempt by publishers to reduce terms on such activities.