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Amazon 'charging publishers 20% for e-book VAT'

Amazon is forcing publishers to start negotiations over e-book prices exclusive of the full 20% VAT charge on e-books despite the true cost to Amazon being only 3%, according to a report in the Guardian.

The newspaper said that it had seen a contract demonstrating that Amazon starts  negotiations with publishers on the basis that the UK VAT rate of 20% must be knocked off the cost price of titles, even though it only has to pay 3% VAT on digital books sold to UK readers because of tax anomalies related to its base in Luxembourg. Amazon thus gains an extra £1.38 of profit every time it sells a £10 e-book in the UK.

The contract also bars the publisher from offering a better deal to a rival retailer without automatically giving the same discount to Amazon, the Guardian said.

The newspaper cited an unnamed publisher as refusing a deal with Amazon which would have resulted in a 92% discount, with the publisher receiving 80p on an e-book selling for £10 on Amazon.co.uk. It also said senior publishing executives complained that Amazon "are not pleasant people to do business with".

Amazon's quoted response was: "Our goal is to make it easy for readers to discover and read the books they love by expanding access to millions of books in both digital and print. We've been able to do this by focusing on innovation, as exemplified by Kindle, and by offering customers the widest selection at the best possible prices and service."

Earlier this year, an investigation published in the Bookseller revealed that Amazon's transfer of its UK business to a Luxembourg-based company in 2006 may have saved the retailer up to £20m in cash.

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If I read this correctly the Guardian has seen ONE (1) contract.

Also, if Amazon did not have this clause, wouldn't heir wholesale price in essence be higher than that of a UK based retailer?

The real problem here is the UK tax regime. Luxembourg has found a way to equalize the VAT on printed books and ebooks, but the UK has not.

The Guardian has conflated a number of different issues and put it together in one piece that implies that Amazon is using VAT to cheat publishers, among a range of tax dodges. The reality is a bit more complex, but I'm not sure anyone will really care about the nuances. And I doubt it will impact Amazon's financial performance. But the mood music is shifting a bit, and that in itself is quite interesting.

"Amazon's quoted response was: "Our goal is to make it easy for readers to discover and read the books they love by expanding access to millions of books in both digital and print. We've been able to do this by focusing on innovation, as exemplified by Kindle, and by offering customers the widest selection at the best possible prices and service."

Nooo, your goal is to take over the entire market and make sure that everyone buys their products from you only. Publishers should plainly retaliate and not close deals with Amazon, because what is Amazon if it doesn't physically have the product to sell? People aren't sheep, they will simply find another retailer. When I'm looking for a good read I don't head to an Amazon site, I walk into a book store where I can query what's good to read and discover books that way. So yes, say I want a digital version then I will go home and find this online at whichever retailer takes my fancy (most likely from the physical retailers site that helped me in the first place).
It's a shame that Amazon sees itself as expanding access to books when the access already exists, if only people could still be bothered to walk into a library!

If I read this correctly the Guardian has seen ONE (1) contract.

Also, if Amazon did not have this clause, wouldn't heir wholesale price in essence be higher than that of a UK based retailer?

The real problem here is the UK tax regime. Luxembourg has found a way to equalize the VAT on printed books and ebooks, but the UK has not.

The Guardian has conflated a number of different issues and put it together in one piece that implies that Amazon is using VAT to cheat publishers, among a range of tax dodges. The reality is a bit more complex, but I'm not sure anyone will really care about the nuances. And I doubt it will impact Amazon's financial performance. But the mood music is shifting a bit, and that in itself is quite interesting.

"Amazon's quoted response was: "Our goal is to make it easy for readers to discover and read the books they love by expanding access to millions of books in both digital and print. We've been able to do this by focusing on innovation, as exemplified by Kindle, and by offering customers the widest selection at the best possible prices and service."

Nooo, your goal is to take over the entire market and make sure that everyone buys their products from you only. Publishers should plainly retaliate and not close deals with Amazon, because what is Amazon if it doesn't physically have the product to sell? People aren't sheep, they will simply find another retailer. When I'm looking for a good read I don't head to an Amazon site, I walk into a book store where I can query what's good to read and discover books that way. So yes, say I want a digital version then I will go home and find this online at whichever retailer takes my fancy (most likely from the physical retailers site that helped me in the first place).
It's a shame that Amazon sees itself as expanding access to books when the access already exists, if only people could still be bothered to walk into a library!