Cover design round-up: February 2017

Cover design round-up: February 2017

Among the highlights in February's selection are a number of covers that use lettering in interesting ways: be it expressive, hand-rendered letterforms; usage of lesser-known but rather striking typefaces; or a font being set (and repeated) in non-linear and unpredictable means. And, in one notable instance, a book cover contains no typography whatsoever – congratulations to designer Steve Marking for getting that one past the marketers...

As ever, let us know your favourites and do share your favourites from our Instagram page, where these will be uploaded throughout the month.

 

    

We have three covers from HarperCollins list 4th Estate to kick off: Birds, Art, Life, Death by Kyo Maclear was designed by Jonathan Pelham, with illustration coming courtesy of the author himself. A Book of American Martyrs by Joyce Carol Oates was designed by Anna Morrison—more of whom imminently...

 

    

...here, in fact: Anna Morrison also designed 4th Estate's Tales of Persuasion, written by Philip Hensher. It's pictured alongside Abrams publication Today I Feel... An Alphabet of Feelings by Madalena Moniz, who illustrated the title. It was designed by Julia Marvel.

 

    

I Don't Want Curly Hair is a picture book published this month by Bloomsbury Children's; it's authored and illustrated by Laura Ellen Anderson. Also pictured is Hit Makers, an Allen Lane publication designed in-house by Tom Etherington that is to feature two different tones of gold foil on its dust jacket.

 

    

Jonathan Cape publication The Blot (a novel) by Jonathan Lethem was designed by gray.318, whom we interviewed last year about the annual cover-design awards he co-founded here. (This year's awards evening will take place on 2nd March: for full submission and event details, visit ABCD here.) Canongate's Darke, by Rick Gekoski, was designed in-house by Peter Adlington.

 

    

Two Chatto & Windus titles are up next: the first, A Herring Famine by Adam O'Riordan, was the result of a collaboration of interns at the publisher; the second, Idaho by Emily Ruskovich, was designed by Vintage's creative director Suzanne Dean.