Gabriel García Márquez: what did he mean to you?

Guardian Books - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 09:54

Where were you when you read One Hundred Years of Solitude? Which of his books made the biggest impact? Share your thoughts, stories and tributes with us in the form of text or images

Right from the very first sentence, the book which launched Gabriel García Márquez to global stardom strikes a tone which captures the reader and opens a new way of seeing the world:

Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.

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Gabriel García Márquez: five must-reads

Guardian Books - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 09:14
The Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez found his voice with his 1967 novel One Hundred Years of Solitude. We round up the key texts from the master of magic realism

Gabriel García Márquez: what did he mean to you?

One Hundred Years of Solitude chronicles seven generations of the Buendía family in the fictional village of Macondo. This tale of prophetic gypsies and incestuous lovers was an instant bestseller, launching García Márquez into worldwide fame and igniting a global boom in Latin American literature.

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Living with a Wild God by Barbara Ehrenreich, review

Telegraph - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 09:00
Staunch atheist Barbara Ehrenreich wonders if she hasn't been searching for God her whole life, says Peter Stanford






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Would Chekhov have stood up to Putin?

Telegraph - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 09:00
When the great playwright lived in the Crimea he defended its people from Russian imperialism. By Rosamund Bartlett
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A God in Every Stone by Kamila Shamsie review

Guardian Books - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 09:00
The bonds between Pashtun men in Flanders and during the struggle for Indian independence are captured in this wartime story of a London archaeologist's travels to Peshawar

Kamila Shamsie's new novel deals with vast sweeps of history. Within its 300 pages, a story unfolds that covers the travels of the fifth-century BCE explorer Scylax, working on behalf of the Persian king Darius I; an attempt by early 20th-century archaeologists to recover the circlet worn by Scylax; the outbreak of the first world war; the experiences of Indian Army troops on the western front and later as injured servicemen in Brighton hospitals; the rise of the non-violent independence movement in Peshawar and the bloody killing of non-violent protesters by the British Army in 1930, in Peshawar's Qissa Khwani Bazaar.

The story follows a young Londoner, Vivian Rose Spencer, from an archaeological dig in Turkey back to Britain where she works as a Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse during the first world war. After a crucial betrayal, she travels on to Peshawar. At the same time, the Pashtun soldier Qayyum Gul goes to Flanders with the 40th Pathans, who fought heroically and suffered devastating casualties during the second battle of Ypres in April 1915. Wounded, Qayyum is treated in Brighton before returning home to Peshawar to wrestle with his injuries and changed loyalties. Qayyum's brilliant younger brother, Najeeb, completes the circle by becoming Vivian's pupil, and later an archaeologist and "campaigner for the freedom from Empire for the peoples of India and Britain". On its way, A God in Every Stone takes in British women's battle for suffrage and the prelude to the Armenian genocide.

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Updike review

Guardian Books - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 07:30
Adam Begley's fine biography reveals a writer enthralled by the detail of his own experience

Only truth is useful, John Updike once wrote; only truth, however harsh, is holy. Fiction may have been his preferred mode but autobiography was the subtext the truth, slightly arranged: "Parents, wives, children," he said in his memoir, Self-Consciousness, "the nearer and dearer they are, the more mercilessly they are served up." A late poem put it more self-accusingly: "I drank up women's tears and spat them out / As 10-point Janson, Roman and ital." Yet the people whose lives he used rarely protested they'd been demeaned or libelled. His tone, in the main, was celebratory. As Adam Begley puts it in this fine biography, Updike "was enthralled by the detail of his own experience", and the magic rubbed off on those around him.

It helped that his early years, as a cherished only child in the small Pennsylvanian town of Shillington, were so idyllic. While his gloomy, stoic father taught high-school maths, his mother stayed at home to nurture him, setting a precedent by clacking away on her typewriter. Though 10 of her stories were later published in the New Yorker, he spoke of her as a would-be writer from whose failure he took off ("My mother knew non-publication's shame / Mine was to be the magic gift instead"). She predicted great things for him, but her efforts on his behalf weren't always appreciated. When he was 13 she moved the family to the small, isolated farmhouse where she'd grown up, quarantining him from his girlfriend and other lowering urban distractions. It was only 11 miles away but felt like an expulsion from Eden. In his fiction, Shillington became Olinger, a town bathed in nostalgic splendour, the home he'd lost.

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Colombian city pays tribute to Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Telegraph - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 07:20
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, the Nobel Prize-winning author, is remembered fondly in the Colombian city of Cartagena, where he began his career as a writer and kept a home






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Gabriel García Márquez in quotes

Guardian Books - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 06:53

A selection of quotes from the Colombian author, who has died at the age of 87

Gabriel García Márquez: what did he mean to you?

It always amuses me that the biggest praise for my work comes for the imagination, while the truth is that there's not a single line in all my work that does not have a basis in reality. The problem is that Caribbean reality resembles the wildest imagination."

From The Paris Review Interviews, Gabriel García Márquez, The Art of Fiction No. 69

All human beings have three lives: public, private, and secret.

Fiction was invented the day Jonah arrived home and told his wife that he was three days late because he had been swallowed by a whale."

The problem with marriage is that it ends every night after making love, and it must be rebuilt every morning before breakfast."

I would not have traded the delights of my suffering for anything in the world."

The secret of good old-age is none other than an honest pact with solitude."

Sex is the consolation you have when you can't have love."

It is not true that people stop pursuing dreams because they grow old, they grow old because they stop pursuing dreams."

He recognised her despite the uproar, through his tears of unrepeatable sorrow at dying without her, and he looked at her for the last and final time with eyes more luminous, more grief-stricken, more grateful than she had ever seen them in half a century of a shared life, and he managed to say to her with his last breath: 'Only God knows how much I loved you.'"

Age has no reality except in the physical world. The essence of a human being is resistant to the passage of time. Our inner lives are eternal, which is to say that our spirits remain as youthful and vigorous as when we were in full bloom. Think of love as a state of grace, not the means to anything, but the alpha and omega. An end in itself."

I became aware that the invincible power that has moved the world is unrequited, not happy, love.

Nothing resembles a person as much as the way he dies."

My heart has more rooms in it than a whore house.

But when a woman decides to sleep with a man, there is no wall she will not scale, no fortress she will not destroy, no moral consideration she will not ignore at its very root: there is no God worth worrying about."

The problem in public life is learning to overcome terror; the problem in married life is learning to overcome boredom."

I don't believe in God, but I'm afraid of Him."

He soon acquired the forlorn look that one sees in vegetarians."

If I knew that today would be the last time Id see you, I would hug you tight and pray the Lord be the keeper of your soul. If I knew that this would be the last time you pass through this door, Id embrace you, kiss you, and call you back for one more. If I knew that this would be the last time I would hear your voice, Id take hold of each word to be able to hear it over and over again. If I knew this is the last time I see you, Id tell you I love you, and would not just assume foolishly you know it already."

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David Malouf and the Go-Betweens: shining a light on Brisbane

Guardian Books - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 01:21

Nikki Lusk chooses apt soundtracks for classic Australian literature. Here she pairs David Malouf's Johnno with the Go-Betweens' 16 Lovers Lane

The influence of your home town, the place in which you while away those formative years of adolescence and early adulthood, can be hard to shake later in life. The particular angle at which sunlight strikes that town; the layout of its streets; its political, social and cultural landscape: these qualities affect your view of the world and the place of your home town within it. For David Malouf and the Go-Betweens, their shared home town of Brisbane becomes a character in their creative output, seen most obviously in Maloufs first novel, Johnno, and also lurking on the Go-Betweens sixth album, 16 Lovers Lane.

Johnno is considered a heavily autobiographical novel, with the narrator, Dante, attending the same school and university as Malouf, and the book even borrowing the fact of Maloufs schoolmate dying young. The eponymous Johnno is an exuberant breeze clearing out the stale air that Dante finds oppressive. Dantes Brisbane of the 1950s is nothing: a city that blew neither hot nor cold, a place where nothing happened, and where nothing would ever happen, because it had no soul. Dante wonders, Have I been shaped in any way fearful prospect! by Brisbane?

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Latin America reacts to death of literary colossus Gabriel García Márquez

Guardian Books - Fri, 18/04/2014 - 01:20
Singer Shakira joins presidents of Colombia and Mexico, as well as Bill Clinton, in paying tribute to Nobel prize-winner

The death of Latin American literary giant Gabriel García Márquez prompted immediate reaction from across the continent and beyond, almost as soon as the first rumours hit the internet early on Thursday afternoon.

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Others had dabbled with magic realism. Gabriel García Márquez made it his own

Guardian Books - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 23:28
An appreciation of the Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez, who has died aged 87, by American novelist Edmund White

One Hundred Years of Solitude is a masterpiece because it is an episodic novel that has a rigorous form an unprecedented combination. From the very beginning we know the town of Macondo will endure only a century, so there is a limit to the length of the narrative.

We discover that we are reading the book written by one of the characters, a Gypsy named Melquíades. At the same time that Aureliano is reading the last pages (written in coded Spanish translated into Sanskrit) so are we; the town and the manuscript go up in flames just as the century comes to a close.

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Gabriel García Márquez, Nobel laureate writer, dies aged 87

Guardian Books - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 23:18
Colombian author became standard-bearer for Latin American letters after success of One Hundred Years of Solitude

Edmund White: García Márquez made magic realism his own
Obituary: catalyst of boom in Latin American literature
Gabriel García Márquez: a life in pictures
From the archive: 1970 review of One Hundred Years of Solitude
Five must-reads
What did García Márquez mean to you?

The Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, who unleashed the worldwide boom in Spanish language literature and magical realism with his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, died at the age of 87. He had been admitted to hospital in Mexico City on 3 April with pneumonia.

Matching commercial success with critical acclaim, García Márquez became a standard-bearer for Latin American letters, establishing a route for negotiations between guerillas and the Colombian government, building a friendship with Fidel Castro and maintaining a feud with fellow literature laureate Mario Vargas Llosa that lasted more than 30 years.

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Gabriel García Márquez obituary

Guardian Books - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 22:52
Colombian Nobel laureate who helped to launch boom in Latin American literature with novel One Hundred Years of Solitude

Few writers have produced novels that are acknowledged as masterpieces not only in their own countries but all around the world. Fewer still can be said to have written books that have changed the whole course of literature in their language. But the Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez, who has died at the age of 87 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease achieved just that, especially thanks to his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Since its publication in 1967, more than 25m copies of the book have been sold in Spanish and other languages. For at least a generation the book firmly stamped Latin American literature as the domain of "magical realism".

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Gabriel García Márquez obituary

Guardian Books - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 22:38
Colombian Nobel laureate who helped to launch boom in Latin American literature with novel One Hundred Years of Solitude

Few writers have produced novels that are acknowledged as masterpieces not only in their own countries but all around the world. Fewer still can be said to have written books that have changed the whole course of literature in their language. But the Colombian writer Gabriel García Márquez, who has died at the age of 87 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease achieved just that, especially thanks to his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Since its publication in 1967, more than 25m copies of the book have been sold in Spanish and other languages. For at least a generation the book firmly stamped Latin American literature as the domain of "magical realism".

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Gabriel García Márquez: He proved that tall tales could be truer than facts

Telegraph - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 22:21
The author of One Hundred Years of Solitude influenced a generation of writers, says Gaby Wood






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Gabriel García Márquez: Top 10 quotes

Telegraph - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 22:19
'Crazy people are not crazy if one accepts their reasoning.'






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Gabriel García Márquez: five essential works

Telegraph - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 22:19
One Hundred Years of Solitude isn't the late author's only classic






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Gabriel García Márquez  a life in pictures

Guardian Books - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 21:44

The Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez, who has died aged 87, helped to ignite the worldwide boom in Spanish literature with novels such as 100 Years of Solitude and Love in the Time of Cholera. Here we celebrate his life with a selection of images charting his journey from childhood in northern Colombia to global literary titan

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TL;DR Wikipedia Shortens Long-Form Entries for Humorous, Mobile Browsing

eBookNewser - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 21:30

Too long, didn’t read may be the most annoying, yet common, consequence  of our media hunger. Go on Facebook, and you’ll see plenty os users having lengthy arguments over stories they did not read. It makes the title of news stories ever more important, albeit, in a superficial, click-bait way.

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New Career Opportunities Daily: The best jobs in media.

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Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children’s Book Awards shortlists announced

Quill & Quire Blog - Thu, 17/04/2014 - 21:08

The finalists have been announced for the Ruth and Sylvia Schwartz Children’s Book Awards, a pair of annual $6,000 prizes that recognize excellence in writing and illustration in Canadian English-language books.

This year’s winners will be selected by two five-member juries from Aldergrove Public School in Markham, Ontario, and will be announced on May 20.

The nominees in the children’s picture-book category are:

The nominees in the young-adult and middle-reader category are:

The awards are administered by the Ontario Arts Foundation with the support of the Ontario Arts Council and funding from the Ruth Schwartz Foundation.

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