David Mitchell offers clues to new novel The Bone Clocks interactive

Guardian Books - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 09:43
The Cloud Atlas author looks ahead to life without oil in his forthcoming metaphysical thriller. Due to be published on 2 September, The Bone Clocks imagines a murderous feud conducted in the shadows of our world. Click the links hidden in the preview cover for a foretaste Continue reading...






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A Sting in the Tale review a book to make you bee-conscious

Guardian Books - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 07:30
Dave Goulson presents an entertaining, fascinating and important study of the plight of the bumblebee

It was Peter Cook who first formally identified the comic potential of the bee; there is something funny about them (such as Cook's Holy Bee of Ephesus, who buzzed around Our Saviour on the cross). They may sting (not the males, though, I was pleased to learn), but they also have charm, and, literally, sweetness. The bumblebee is the most charming of the lot; even its Latin name, Bombus, is amusing, and in the way Professor Goulson tells its story, we are never far from a smile, however clearly he states their grave predicament. It would appear their charm has rubbed off on him.

I noticed the words "bestseller" on the cover of this book, and thought "Come off it," but Goulson is particularly gifted at transmitting his enthusiasm for, and knowledge of, these flying balls of fur, so it shouldn't be a surprise. Experts in animal behaviour do tend to be, to a hugely engaging degree, oddballs. (Cf Hugh Warwick's A Prickly Affair, about hedgehogs, which I reviewed four years ago.)

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Bonita Avenue by Peter Buwalda, review

Telegraph - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 07:00
Anthony Cummins hails a novel which bears comparison with Franzen and Roth






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Comics Unmasked: Anarchy in the UK, British Library

Telegraph - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 07:00
From Oz Magazine to V for Vendetta, British comics have been wildly subversive, as a new British Library exhibition shows






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Gabriel García Márquez memorial held

Guardian Books - Tue, 22/04/2014 - 05:54

Presidents of Mexico and Colombia lead tributes to author, with paper yellow butterflies launched at Bellas Artes Palace

New extract hints at Marquez's 'last legacy'

Guardian readers' tributes

A flurry of paper yellow butterflies rounded off a simple but moving memorial ceremony to celebrate the life and work of Latin American literary giant Gabriel García Márquez who died in his home in Mexico City last Thursday at the age of 87.

The ceremony inside the Mexican capital's grand Bellas Artes Palace on Monday night included eulogies given by Juan Manuel Santos, president of the writer's native Colombia, and Enrique Peña Nieto, president of Mexico, García Márquez's adopted home for most of the last 50 years.

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Google Glass Allowing Users to Try a Pair But Only for Looks

eBookNewser - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 23:20

Google is offering a not-so-cheap alternative for users who want to see just how it feels to be a Glasshole, but only on the outside. The trial versions costs only $50 so they have zero technological functionality whatsoever. Think of it as a Warbly Parker with a weird, clunky accessory that can’t take selfies: terrible.

If this is a wearable device you are seeking, we hear you can call 855-9Glass9 to try it out, but take our advice, only try these Glasses on indoors in the safety of your own home. If you go outside and you live in San Francisco, a mean stranger will try and swipe it off of your face and you will have lost your $50 for naught. At least with $50 you can buy things in Candy Crush Saga and give them to Facebook friends, who will not make fun of you for wearing Google Glass.

continued…

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New App From Developers Help Berlin’s Sex Workers Connect With Clients

eBookNewser - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 21:34

Many consider sex-work to be the oldest profession on the planet, and now, that profession is also getting a little help from modern technology since they are definitely not getting it from Berlin’s modern laws.

Launched on April 1, the app Peppr, is like a virtual sex shop where sex-seeking clients can find a sex-worker worth paying. The app allows sex-workers to wait inside for a client at a warm place of their choosing: it is cold outside and they might run into a member of the law or a cold, unfriendly draft. Berlin is a cold place with unfriendly sex laws, but it’s colder if you have to wear a sexy uniform. continued…

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Cognoa is Developing an App to Help Parents Detect Risks for Autism

eBookNewser - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 20:59

Autism is usually not detectable in small children until about the age of three. For the developers at Cognoa, changing that detection time period is a major goal since it can often mean the difference between intervention and a lot of missed education.

Cognoa’s is a prediction and evaluation app for parents. It relies on parents to answer questions about their infant behavior. Then,  it couples that information with recorded activities of their child to determine whether small children are at-risk for autism. continued…

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Book links roundup: Media reaction to Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s death

Quill & Quire Blog - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 17:32
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‘2048′ Leads The Top Free iPhone Apps List This Week

eBookNewser - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 16:00

This week’s leading free iOS app is still 2048, an addicting number puzzle game that seems to be spreading faster than wildfire. The top seven apps this week are all games – a decidedly good fortune for those seeking solace on a manic Monday. If you have your own favorite free game, send it over via the comment section.

 

Below, we’ve listed the top free iPhone apps of the week. The list links to Inside Network’s research about the individual apps, including historical charts, developer information and download information. continued…

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Alex Through the Looking-Glass by Alex Bellos, review

Telegraph - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 16:00
Mathematical equations should have the perfect symmetry of a joke, says Tom Chivers






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Sina Queyras and Adam Sol on the state of Canadian poetry

Quill & Quire Blog - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 15:38

Sina Queyras and Adam Sol (photo: Hudson Hayden)

It is virtually impossible to argue against the notion that Canadian poetry has come of age. If F.R. Scott was able to say, as recently as 1976, that when he and A.J.M. Smith launched the McGill Fortnightly Review in the mid-1920s “there was not a single Canadian poet we paid much attention to,” no such attitude could prevail in 2014.

From Ken Babstock to Karen Solie, from Erin Mouré to Elizabeth Bachinsky, poetry in Canada has obliterated the boundaries set for it by the Confederation poets, and announced itself, both within and outside our borders, as heterodox, vibrant, and thriving. At least one volume, Christian Bök’s Eunoia, has achieved bona fide bestsellerdom, and Anne Carson has attained something resembling rock-star status.

Sina Queyras and Adam Sol are two prominent figures in the current landscape. Queyras won both the Pat Lowther Award and a Lambda Literary Award for her 2007 collection, Lemon Hound, and has been at the forefront of poetic discourse in Canada as a result of her online literary magazine of the same name. Her 2009 collection, Expressway, was shortlisted for a Governor General’s Literary Award. Queyras lives in Montreal, where she teaches in the English department at Concordia University.

Sol’s 2004 book, Crowd of Sounds, won the Trillium Book Award for Poetry, and his follow-up, Jeremiah, Ohio, was nominated for the same prize. Sol is a tenured professor at Laurentian University in Barrie, Ontario, teaching courses in literature and creative writing.

With new books out this season – Queyras’s M x T, from Coach House Books, and Sol’s Complicity, from McClelland & Stewart – the time seemed right to get them together for a broad discussion of where Canadian poetry is at present, and where it might be headed.

Read the Q&A >>

This article appeared in the April 2014 issue of Q&Q.

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Video: A Demonstration on How the Vatican is Digitizing its Sacred Texts

eBookNewser - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 15:00

Digital access to the vatican’s vast collection of old manuscripts are slowly becoming more accessible thanks to a four year collaboration between the church and Japanese digital technology group, NTT Data. In the video below of the announcement, you can see some of that process. It’s pretty fascinating, especially if you like old, dusty pages, or if you’ve never seen the interior of the Vatican library, where the physical manuscripts actually live.

It’s not in English so we’ve also shared the translated texts of the transcript below, after the jump.

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Poem of the week: Present Tense by Michael Schmidt

Guardian Books - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 14:30
Recalling Donne's sermon on Job 19:26, with a bit of Ovidian metamorphosis thrown in, this modern meditation on memory and resurrection shifts between past, present and future

Resurrection takes various forms in this week's poem, Present Tense, from Stories of My Life by Michael Schmidt. In the opening lines, it's an organic recycling, begun by worms and helped by the digestive processes of other small industrious creatures. The geographical dimension of bodily decomposition ("north and south") recalls John Donne's sermon on Job 19:26: "Shall I imagine a difficulty in my body because I have lost an Arme in the East and a leg in the West some bloud in the North and some bones in the South?" But here there's nothing distressed or macabre in this. A calmly regular trimeter pulse helps the process seem natural and benign, while the verb "travels" lets light into underground darkness. As for Donne, the bodily dispersal complicates, but in no way cancels, the promise of personal resurrection: "Christ will have to raise/ An entire field "

There's also an Ovidian kind of metamorphosis that is central to the poem. The literalised concept of resurrection on judgment day ("an entire field") leads to the older, pagan image of woman as tree ("like Laura"). When Daphne was changed into a laurel tree in Metamorphosis, her first awareness began with finding "her feet benumb'd and fastened to the ground." So the woman in Schmidt's poem will "stand/ On trunks for feet and pray/ Like Laura turned to tree/ With bough and bloom " The simile: "like Laura," leads, of course, to Petrarch, Number 23 of the Canzoniere, as well as to Ovid. At Apollo's decree, laurel provided the wreath for acclaimed poets and military victors. Is either profession significant to the old man?

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The best history podcasts

Telegraph - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 14:15
The best history podcasts, from oral histories to trivia about royal history, selected and updated by Pete Naughton






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The best arts, books and entertainment podcasts

Telegraph - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 14:00
The best arts, entertainment, books and culture podcasts, selected and updated by Pete Naughton






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The best podcasts for stories, fiction and poetry

Telegraph - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 14:00
The best story and poetry podcasts including short stories, readings of fiction and real-life dramas, selected and updated by Pete Naughton






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iPad Addiction Hurts Infants’ Ability to Use Real Building Blocks

eBookNewser - Mon, 21/04/2014 - 14:00

Small children may have difficulty understanding real space if they spend too much time in digital space. Recent findings show that with too many hours on iPad and digital devices, children can lose the ability to play with building blocks like their parents.

The news comes from the UK’s Association of Teachers and Lecturers, who advise parents to keep digital hours to a minimum, especially right before bed. Teacher Colin Kinney thinks that without restraint, the effect of having too much digital time can lead to poor development in children’s social as well as motor skills: continued…

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